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Career Officer
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 4,043
# 27
12-07-2012, 03:20 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by wunjee View Post
Logical arguments:

1) This is not another game, so model should not function as it did in another game.
Except the person who claimed it was in another game has not yet managed to prove that it is in another game.
And there's no eveidence I could find anyone ever created even a model named Tor'kaht for Armada not to mention it would have to look like the ship in STO for this to make even remote sense.
And then there's the matter that Cryptic can't just use stuff produced by another game company, or fan merterial.

Quote:
Originally Posted by wunjee View Post
2) Klingons build cosmetic uselessness into pure-bread purpose-built warships.
HMM, what does "cosmetic uselessness" in this context mean?
The Bird of Prey has wings for atmospheric operations.
In addition the recetly release Haynes Owner's Workship Manualexplains that the wings move into the horizontal for cruising because the canon BoP has its actual warp propulsion system in the wings (it does not have warp coils, but plates) and this system works best when the plates are in the same plane as the hull.
They move into a lowered position for an improved field of fire and because the plasma lines constrict which allows more concentrated warp plasma to be fed to the weaspons.
And the move into an upward position for landing so they don't touch the ground.

Please note the wings never moved on the larger cruiser-sized models, probably because it makes no sense at that size for field of fire purposes.
And ships of that size probably don't land on planes but can still move through the atmosphere for attacks.

Quote:
Originally Posted by wunjee View Post
Seems legit.

Moving parts always adds flavor to ingame models. Could be a Bugatti Veyron's spoiler on Need for Speed or the functioning BCG on an M4 in Fallout 3. People like moving parts..You can't tell someone to tell you how something would be visually appealing, because it's all a matter of taste to begin with. That's like asking someone to tell you what rhythm is. You either know or you don't..
Taste is certainly something very hard to debate over, but for example spoilers on (real) cars usually move because they have a function and that characteristic is usually replicated in a simulation/somewhat accurate racing game.