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Captain
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 2,389
# 83
12-12-2012, 10:55 AM
First appearance on-screen of a BoP (klingon variety) was in the movies-in particular, Star Trek III, followed by STIV, and finally VI.

After the movies, BoPs appeared in Star Trek: The Next Generation. the interior of the common KDF ships from this game is based (loosely) on the interior shots from the episode where Riker did a stretch as an exchange officer on a KDF Bird of Prey.

TNG is also the reason you have BoPs of differing sizes-including the apocryphal K'vort (Cruiser size) BoP. (Modeling issues at Paramount)

They got more consistent as small, powerful ships in DS9, where BoPs were mainstay units in fighting the Cardies and Jem'Hadar, where they were a decent match-up against Jem'Hadar attack ships that were eating Galaxy cruisers for breakfast (and giving the Defiant a hard time.)

in TNG, BoPs were often in the company of larger KDF ships, in DS9 they were often run in squadrons-like fighters (the 'cavalry raid' Gen. Martok organized being a prime example), or as mainstay/lead elements (the KDF reinforcement at the 2nd battle of DS9) of formations.

Raptors had ONE on-screen appearance, on Enterprise.


All of this makes sense in the context of ST "History" and the destruction of Praxis-a cash-strapped Klingon Empire WOULD tend to turn to smaller ships to fill out fleet ranks during the interim between Kirk and Picard, with fewer, but better-constructed/designed cruisers operating as 'flag vessels' for squadrons (in the naval sense) made up of mostly-smaller-ships, esp. ships capable of independent operations and movement under stealth to a degree that larger vessels simply aren't capable of.

Now it's been well over 30 years since the Dominion War in STO's history, we SHOULD be seeing more and better cruisers-but those cruisers would necessarily have to actuallly BE better to draw funds for construction-the Klingon Empire's been operating at a reduced size and scale compared to the Federation for nearly a century, and you build what your infrastructure can SUPPORT.

Raptors coming back into operation makes sense in this context-their handling in the game is closer to "pocket cruiser" than "Frigate"-lots of power,but cruiser handling minus one weapons emplacement and some consumables, BoPs make sense in this context as low-cost ships that can be used for reconaissance and punch above their weight, the Vor'cha and Negh'Var make sense as manueverable enough to keep up with their squadrons while delivering the goods and tough enough to serve as flag vessels.

These all show an integrated doctrine in design/logistics and an integrated, thought-out tactical doctrine.

The Vo'Quv even works here, as a "Fleet support ship" capable of serviciing and coordinating groups of smaller BoP-class ships or fighter cover in siege conditions where raiding is ineffective or inappropriate, or where you need an 'anchor' near, but not ON, the front line-a mobile base ship.

what doesn't fit with this, is the Bortasque we actually GOT in STO; it doesn't work with the rest of them, and doesn't work well on its own-it only works as the 'anchor' for a formation of OTHER slow ships fighting in "Line" formation-which does not fit with KDF tactical doctrine as demonstrated either in the later (in-universe) era series, nor in practice with present resources in-game.

The Bortasque' works, however, in Fedball formations-aka line-grouping where it sits as anchor to a group of OTHER slow cruisers flying/hovering in close formation and coordinating defensive fire. in short, it's designed as a poor cousin of the Oddy, built to fill a similar role in a similar naval structure.

KDF doctrine is an aggressive doctrine, and the Bortasque is a defensive doctrine ship. This is the fundamental flaw of the design, one exacerbated by the cannon main gun and ability to mount DHC's that it can't use effectively due to turn-rate defects.

It 'fits' with KDF style of tactics the way a 14th century european knight in full-plate 'fits' with 19th century Apache cavalry, or the way a slow, tracked assault gun would fit with post-1950's MBT/cavalry tactics. (which is to say: it doesn't fit the tactical doctrine at ALL.)

where it fits in STO: why, in STF's. Particularly where it can be partnered with other slow turning cruisers to fight in fedball formation against fixed opposition (ISE) moving along fixed routes (ISE), slowly (ISE) so that your fixed-forward main gun and lack of manuever is less of a defect (ISE), and timing is less critical because you can't fail out the mission on the clock (ISE).
"when you're out of Birds of Prey, you're out of ships."

Last edited by patrickngo; 12-12-2012 at 11:10 AM.