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Captain
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 3,359
# 82
01-16-2013, 11:59 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by gulberat View Post
On a psychological level, perhaps the extreme genetic closeness between the two meant it was a bit of a narcissistic thing on Marcus' part?
Yes, I think that there would be a certain amount of narcissism to it, overall, I just figured GSA would be a suitably significant personality flaw

Quote:
Originally Posted by gulberat View Post
Yeah...definitely not arguing that. I was just explaining why I had thought she was even more nuts than she really was.
I think if it had been a longer piece, I might indeed have had the interactions with the modern crew taking more sinister turns, but mostly, I just wanted to reinforce that the haunting had been a genuine experience

Quote:
Originally Posted by gulberat View Post
I never understood why we didn't see more evidence of human influence on Worf. There should've been at least something, unless he deliberately played ignorant of human customs. BTW, he should, specifically, have shown at least some influence of Belorussian culture. Even a little reference or vocabulary word here and there would've helped to make that backstory feel less tacked-on.
Worf made a comment in DS-9 about how he had accidentally killed another child while playing soccer, so I think as a child, he may indeed have participated more in Human culture, but become more withdrawn after that incident. The episode of TNG where they found the other Klingons showed just how separated from Klingon culture Worf truly was. If anything, Sisko embraced the Klingon lifestyle much more than Worf ever did

Quote:
Originally Posted by gulberat View Post
The difference between Alyosha and a "native-raised" Devidian is much greater. I would imagine young Devidians are taught to ignore the terror of their victims. There's a telling line in "Time's Arrow" where it was apparently so bad that Troi is able to feel an aftershock of the victims' fear even though their life force has been completely consumed already. That made me think that the process was a) deeply distressing or painful to the victim and b) the victims felt their attackers' malevolence and hunger.

(That's also why--besides the fact that I had a mutiny to prevent!--that I allowed the victims to feel Alyosha's emotions as he fought to bring them back.)

They probably view it from the same moral standpoint as when you raise a child on a farm and teach him or her to accept the slaughter of livestock. (Of course to many humans there's a big difference between livestock and another human being, but the point remains.) When Alyosha accidentally killed his caretaker as a child, no one had ever taught him that, so he reacted from a "natural" conscience and it absolutely shook him to the core.
It could be, that Devidians are somewhat like Vampires when it comes to learning to ignore the terror of their victims. I often wondered if a Vampire's 'lack of a soul', was what enabled them to feed without feeling sympathy for their victims. You're definitely going to have to post up more of Alyosha's escapades, I'd love to read them

Last edited by marcusdkane; 01-16-2013 at 12:19 PM.