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Captain
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 2,961
# 87
01-17-2013, 03:53 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by gulberat View Post
Yeah, especially since "normally" GSA occurs when the siblings were not raised together (and therefore the Westermarck effect didn't prevent the attraction).
That's very true... Of course, incest is not illegal in Japan, so I think the Westermarck effect may be as much social conditioning, as some 'inbuilt' biological awareness. Equally, Alix's genetic re-sequencing could have nullified the Westermarck effect in regards to her own behavior, and Marcus could simply be a deviant in his own right, because as mentioned, people felt he was 'too perfect', and as I wasn't willing to change him with regards that perfection, I had to add a flaw equally disgraceful to compensate

Quote:
Originally Posted by gulberat View Post
Not so sure about Sisko, but it might well be arguable that Curzon and Jadzia Dax were more into the "modern" Klingon culture than Worf was.
Dax was definitely into Klingon culture, and 'got it' more than Worf ever did. As for Sisko, I was thinking of the episode where they had to go undercover as Klingons at some event to assassinate Gowron, and Sisko was able to really 'get into character'

Quote:
Originally Posted by gulberat View Post
And yeah, I was definitely thinking about the soccer incident that Worf had. But it strikes me that he seems ignorant of human culture to the point of not even knowing the basics that you couldn't help seeing if you were watching TV, or the 24th-century equivalent thereof.
I do see what you mean, I'm just wondering if some of that wasn't simply feigned behavior and deliberate cultural rejection, so no one could doubt his Klingon Credentials, rather than a genuine ignorance

Quote:
Originally Posted by gulberat View Post
Quite possibly. Then again, plain old human psychology is capable of some pretty serious extremes on its own (think of the Milgram and Stanford Prison Experiments! ). Even regular people, if not specifically educated to watch for it, are subject to dangerous and even cruel cognitive biases. That's part of why I decided to go with the explanation of it being a learned behavior rather than some sort of genetic inability to emote or feel sympathy. There's a whole evolutionary explanation I've been coming up with, but I won't post it here because it would take up way too much room.
That's very true, and definitely makes sense that you went with that route. The explanation sounds fantastic, it would be great to read it

Quote:
Originally Posted by gulberat View Post
Thanks! Hopefully the next prompts will inspire me. Exploring the fallout of this incident is definitely something I would do, given the opportunity.
You're very welcome, and likewise, thanks for your feedback on my own entry, it's very much appreciated, I'll look forwards to seeing what entries future challenges inspire you to create