Lt. Commander
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 120
# 11
05-18-2010, 01:43 PM
Unfortunately, I don't understand sector space at all. We can't be at warp, does anyone know why?

"Faster than light, no left and right."

You can not turn while at warp.

Sector space is just a mess (In my opinion) Though I can't think of a "non boring" (my opinion) way of having warp speed space. It would basically be point, click, wait. Of course you could walk around on the "interiors" during the flight. But if they do that they might as well remove the outside view, I mean it would serve no purpose.

Anyway, can't turn at warp. So sector space is not a "true" representation of warp speed.

(EDIT To put foot in mouth)
Quote:
This episode first establishes the Starfleet guideline "Faster than light, no left or right" or "Maintain a linear trajectory wherever possible while at warp speed". This is the only episode in any of the modern Trek series to place a restriction on the movement of a vessel at warp speed. Consequently, this is the only episode where a starship is not able to maneuver at warp speeds.
Voyager: "Fury"
Lt. Commander
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# 12
05-18-2010, 04:46 PM
It's also been pretty well-established that ships can't/shouldn't go to warp while inside a star system (it was a 5 or 6 hour impulse flight from DS9 to Bajor, for example), but I'm pretty happy that the game has done away with that particular piece of canon.
Lt. Commander
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# 13
05-18-2010, 04:48 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeff-El
It's also been pretty well-established that ships can't/shouldn't go to warp while inside a star system (it was a 5 or 6 hour impulse flight from DS9 to Bajor, for example), but I'm pretty happy that the game has done away with that particular piece of canon.
Actually I assumed it was due to it being "war time", though I confess I do not know the faux rules behind federation wars.
Lt. Commander
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# 14
05-18-2010, 07:38 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by adigregorio View Post
Actually I assumed it was due to it being "war time", though I confess I do not know the faux rules behind federation wars.
It was SOP on Deep Space Nine in the early seasons as well, before the war ever started.

What I can't recall is whether they explicitly stated this "rule" on-screen, or if it was just implied by the fact that they never did it. At most, I suspect there's one or two episodes where they discuss how risky it is, and then go to warp while inside a star system.
Lt. Commander
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# 15
05-19-2010, 10:42 AM
My understanding is that you can turn at warp, but its gentle turns with massivly wide sweeping arcs...much too inefficient.

Consider this, in excess of Mach 3, the SR-71 would have such a large turning radius, that if it was flying east to west and started a course reversal(i believe this at a standard rate turn of 3 degs per sec) over Los Angeles by tuirning north, it would be over San Francisco before it was facing the other direction. It would be much better off pointing itself on its desired course at much lower speeds before initiating its supersonic flight regime.

Now, on the Sector map, our turns look tight because the scale has been compressed. The turns we see are over a mucg larger area of distance...and likly time too. Considering it takes light years by the maps own distance calculations to make the turn. if you could sit on a planet and watch these turns through a telecope, you'd likly see a very wide and sweeping, maybe barely even perceptible turn in some cases, unless viewed over time.
Lt. Commander
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# 16
05-19-2010, 11:16 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by cocoa-jin View Post
Consider this, in excess of Mach 3, the SR-71 would have such a large turning radius...
Well, there are two problems with this (Just from my limited perspective).

1: We are in space, so the effects on the "star ship" versus the "air ship" would be different.

2: At Mach 3 the SR-71 is not creating a subspace field around itself, essentially bending space-time or "warping" it around the ship. In essence it brings things in front of the ship closer, and pushes things behind the ship farther away. (Remember, limited perspective) So technically the star ship is not moving but the space around it is.

EDIT (To Add)
Man that was terrible, here:

There is a fly flying inside of your car, your car is going 55 miles an hour. Is the fly's "turn radius" limited by going 55 miles an hour?
Lt. Commander
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# 17
05-19-2010, 11:29 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by adigregorio View Post
There is a fly flying inside of your car, your car is going 55 miles an hour. Is the fly's "turn radius" limited by going 55 miles an hour?
Yes, in the sense that it's ability to change the direction of the car is limited.

Meh, Star Trek is so inconsistent about whether things like combat are even occuring at warp or sub-light that there is no way you can say anything about its 'rules'.
Lt. Commander
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 120
# 18
05-19-2010, 12:14 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeff-El
It was SOP on Deep Space Nine in the early seasons as well, before the war ever started.

What I can't recall is whether they explicitly stated this "rule" on-screen, or if it was just implied by the fact that they never did it. At most, I suspect there's one or two episodes where they discuss how risky it is, and then go to warp while inside a star system.
I always assume that it was either because of the risk of warping into a planet/moon/asteroid or that the gravity of the planet/moon/asteroid would somehow interfere. I think that the first mention that it was dangerous was in TNG.

Another reason I just thought of is that repeatedly going to warp near a planet could damage the planet, probably its atmosphere.
Lt. Commander
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# 19
05-19-2010, 01:50 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Naevius
Yes, in the sense that it's ability to change the direction of the car is limited.
But the "Car" is the subspace bubble in my example. The "fly" is the star ship.

The fly can turn 360 degrees with no resistance due to speed/etc.
Lt. Commander
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# 20
05-19-2010, 07:16 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by adigregorio View Post
But the "Car" is the subspace bubble in my example. The "fly" is the star ship.

The fly can turn 360 degrees with no resistance due to speed/etc.
Because the air its flying and you the observer are all moving together, you only see the fly's flight track relative to your "stationary" position and the relative "stationary"(to you) air its flying in.

But then again, you severly limit the ability to fully see the relationship from an outside observer since you cant have the insect fly outside the car.

Now, my uninformed thought on the matter is that even though ships move the universe around it, there still seems to be some relative motion within/relative to some fluid around the ship. If its a fluid, it likly has a less than perfect efficiency...there will be a bit of slop. I'd assume the faster you move the fluid, the less efficient and the more slop you get. It doesnt matter if the fluid moves around you or you move through it...the relativity of the object/fluid interaction is the same.

Its like an airfoil. You can get the airfoil to to create its asymeterical displacement to produce the locomotive force to pull/move the airfoil/object through the fluid. It doesnt matter if you move the airfoil in the fluid to create the asymeterical disturbance that produces the "lift"(wing)/propulsion(prop)...or if you move the fluid around the airfoil/object...you still cant bend the fluid or displace the object from thier path very easily...the faster you do it, the harder it is.

A warp bubble(energy field...charged?) seems to do to sub-space/the fabric of space-time, what an ionic water jet or a magentized airfoil would by pulling the fluid its in through or around itself to produce force/propulsion.

Changing direction is going to be relative to the fluid the object is traveling in...since we the observer are stuck(more or less stationary...especially compared to the warping ship) in the fluid, the change of direction would be like the ship moving through space...if we could actually percieve it.

Thats my take...its in no way perfectly sound...its just the best I can get to piece the situtation together.
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