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Captain
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 649
# 91
09-20-2012, 02:19 AM
With the news of chemisit walking on more nuclear batteries for spaceships, I wonder how much power one of these can generate and will it be enough to give thrust in the VASIMR engine?

Also any reason why they are talking so long 2013 for the first true test of the engine on the ISS? Apparently this technology has been around for decades and yet it looks like they are only just getting started, Ad Astra was founded over 5 years ago, why has it taken them this long? Also from the Vids on youtube and articles i have read about the VASIMR, why haven't they test this on a nuclear power source yet, nasa has over a decade ago on and ion engine.

Last edited by raj011; 09-20-2012 at 02:24 AM.
Commander
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 441
# 92
09-20-2012, 02:50 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by raj011 View Post
With the news of chemisit walking on more nuclear batteries for spaceships, I wonder how much power one of these can generate and will it be enough to give thrust in the VASIMR engine?

Also any reason why they are talking so long 2013 for the first true test of the engine on the ISS? Apparently this technology has been around for decades and yet it looks like they are only just getting started, Ad Astra was founded over 5 years ago, why has it taken them this long? Also from the Vids on youtube and articles i have read about the VASIMR, why haven't they test this on a nuclear power source yet, nasa has over a decade ago on and ion engine.
some light reading

some of those might explain it a bit better while some call it an ion engine it actually isn't one. it gets much hotter supplying more thrust, ~> plasma engine. typical ion engines are low thrust. they just don't have much power.

ion trusters

the advantages of both types over high power chemical rockets is less over all reaction mass needed (fuel) and in VASIMR's case it can use almost any gas. though some provide better results than others. argon is the one i see used most often. greatly simplifies fuel delivery, and no flammable chemicals ^_^

ion engines are tried and tested (in most types) technologies, been around for years, VASIMR's brand new...of course they're going to go slow and test the crap out of it...a failure for any reason could be catastrophic if a crew is relying on one.

Last edited by deadspacex64; 09-20-2012 at 02:52 AM.
Captain
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 649
# 93
09-20-2012, 07:18 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by deadspacex64 View Post
some light reading

some of those might explain it a bit better while some call it an ion engine it actually isn't one. it gets much hotter supplying more thrust, ~> plasma engine. typical ion engines are low thrust. they just don't have much power.

ion trusters

the advantages of both types over high power chemical rockets is less over all reaction mass needed (fuel) and in VASIMR's case it can use almost any gas. though some provide better results than others. argon is the one i see used most often. greatly simplifies fuel delivery, and no flammable chemicals ^_^

ion engines are tried and tested (in most types) technologies, been around for years, VASIMR's brand new...of course they're going to go slow and test the crap out of it...a failure for any reason could be catastrophic if a crew is relying on one.


you have given me something I already read and know, where do you think I have been getting my information from but still does not answer any of my questions. All you have given me at the end of you post is an assumption which I already thought off but want a definite answer from the horse mouth but I still value and respect what you posted so at least I am not the only one who us thinking that. You know the old saying great minds think alike. VASIMR is not really new, it is technology which NASA has already started and Franklin brought the tech to continue it in the Private sector which he and others created it decades ago since 1977. Thanks for trying anyway .
Commander
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 441
# 94
09-20-2012, 08:24 AM
from what i read...they didn't have the technology back then so a 1977 concept is irrelevant if you can't make it...it's a theory. there are more than a few great concepts in many fields that cannot yet be produced lacking technology in materials and other areas. when those devices can be made...they'll still go through rigorous testing.

how can they know how well the materials, the electronics, fuel feed system, etc will hold up out of the test bed? in a real world application? up to 40% of VASIMR's output is waste heat...how will that effect the station? the engines components? it's going to be in pulsed operation on the station how will that change the engine? it's power characteristics? will it stress the the electronics that control everything?

they have to test it, and probably will continue to test it for a few more years...i can totally agree with that approach, better safe than sorry. there is no margin for error in space. no tow truck that will come and tow you home. it has to be proven reliable. lives will depend on it.
Captain
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 649
# 95
09-20-2012, 08:28 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by deadspacex64 View Post
from what i read...they didn't have the technology back then so a 1977 concept is irrelevant if you can't make it...it's a theory. there are more than a few great concepts in many fields that cannot yet be produced lacking technology in materials and other areas. when those devices can be made...they'll still go through rigorous testing.

how can they know how well the materials, the electronics, fuel feed system, etc will hold up out of the test bed? in a real world application? up to 40% of VASIMR's output is waste heat...how will that effect the station? the engines components? it's going to be in pulsed operation on the station how will that change the engine? it's power characteristics? will it stress the the electronics that control everything?

they have to test it, and probably will continue to test it for a few more years...i can totally agree with that approach, better safe than sorry. there is no margin for error in space. no tow truck that will come and tow you home. it has to be proven reliable. lives will depend on it.
True better safe than sorry but surely it does not take that long to see if it can and can't do all those you have mentioned?
Captain
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 649
# 96
10-07-2012, 02:58 PM
Look what I found, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Helicon...Layer_Thruster

Looks like Vasimr has competition, there is nothing like good old healthy competition . Hope they both work.


And this.

http://nextbigfuture.com/2012/10/zpi...lse-space.html

Last edited by raj011; 10-07-2012 at 03:25 PM.
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