Starfleet Veteran
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 1,618
# 1 Ram
04-07-2013, 12:10 AM
Might not be the proper place for this but.

I was looking at upgrading my ram from the stock stuff the computer came with.

I found this on newegg and was wondering if anyone has used them before.
Actualy reading things pefore posting will make you look smarter than yelling loudly. Reading comprehension is aparently a lost art.

Not everything you see on the internet is true - Abriham Lincoln
Career Officer
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 233
# 2
04-07-2013, 02:15 AM
its fine but your overpaying for 1333mhz ram on an OEM boared go with value based ram, that kind of ram is preformance ram meant for overclocking.
Starfleet Veteran
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 1,618
# 3
04-07-2013, 02:20 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by spork87 View Post
its fine but your overpaying for 1333mhz ram on an OEM boared go with value based ram, that kind of ram is preformance ram meant for overclocking.
Eh the value ram isn't much cheeper. Plus I plan on upgrading the board in the next 2 or 3 months.

But on the OP you haven't had any issues?
Actualy reading things pefore posting will make you look smarter than yelling loudly. Reading comprehension is aparently a lost art.

Not everything you see on the internet is true - Abriham Lincoln

Last edited by disposeableh3r0; 04-07-2013 at 02:57 AM.
Lt. Commander
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 141
# 4
04-07-2013, 01:04 PM
Unless that HP case can take that motherboard *Unlikely* your Also need a new case.
Starfleet Veteran
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 1,618
# 5
04-07-2013, 05:26 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by aureleus View Post
Unless that HP case can take that motherboard *Unlikely* your Also need a new case.
Obviously. but the case doesn't enhance performance so the one I use won't matter. I probably have an old ATX case somewhere anyway.

As it is I'm going for parts that are compatable with what I have now so that I can buy them over time, use them, and when I have all the money I need, build my better PC.

This will hopefuly save me money in the long run as I can just use the perfectly good bits on the old comp for the new one (HDD CD and such).

After the MoBo ill be getting a new processor. And since my old processor will fit the board I can still use it while I wait.
Actualy reading things pefore posting will make you look smarter than yelling loudly. Reading comprehension is aparently a lost art.

Not everything you see on the internet is true - Abriham Lincoln

Last edited by disposeableh3r0; 04-07-2013 at 06:47 PM.
Lieutenant
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 51
# 6
04-07-2013, 08:21 PM
Ram rarely runs into issues so long as you leave it alone. Messing with voltages and overclocking is where issues come up. Ram, much like... most other electronic components... rarely come from anywhere except for a very specific 3 or 4 places. If the reviews on newegg don't state otherwise, assume that it is a relatively safe thing to buy.

RAM defects are usually individual sticks, and the frequency is probably in the low 1-3% range on most manufactured defects. Between value and high end, that number probably doesn't change. More often than not, the difference between the two is the clock capabilities and not the ram itself.

Now, all of that being said, I should note that I mean very specifically the RAM itself is most likely, good. G.Skill isn't a bad manufacturer, and they've in the past scored rather highly on performance metrics.

However, and this goes for /all/ performance ram, compatibility is a touchy subject. There is no guarantee that high end ram will work in a standard HP motherboard. Matched sticks help, but they don't do anything to guarantee this, either. The problem stems from the reality of the beast: buying a manufactured PC means corners are cut to ensure a reasonable price for the consumer. They did not build the PC to be the best, they built the PC to be reasonably affordable.

Because of this, the components on the motherboard (Northbridge/Southbridge to be precise), can occasionally throw issues with high end ram. The voltages and clocks required don't tend to blend with bargain controllers. While the processor does not suffer this problem, the board likely will.

There are compatibility sites around (sorry, I don't feel up to googling), that should tell you whether or not that specific RAM (or even the general model range) will work with your desktop. Be aware though, that if this happens to be the case, Newegg will not refund you because you made a bad choice: the ram wont be defective. If it does not test as such, you may be forfeit of your money.

Edit: Just as an FYI, what I said above on compatibility is not from a strictly value->value point of view. Higher end RAM behaves differently than standard ram. Because of this, even if every value "matches" the ram (even latencies, voltages, etc), it doesn't necessarily mean it is identical. The hardware on it, is still different, and as such it can respond differently. If the onboard controllers that are mapped to control memory, and the busses that are connected to it, are incapable of handling the different responses, you will have an issue. This is not present in all desktops, but in a reasonable majority it is. Unfortunately, it is also an issue that happens in high performance boards as well (but not as frequently).

The symptoms are varied, from booting up with memory beeps to booting fine and crashing alot with page errors. It just depends on where the problem is specifically found.

I would suggest after purchasing, running memtest86 from a bootdisk, and do a full test for a few hours, to make sure you run into no issues.

Last edited by agentgreasy; 04-07-2013 at 08:29 PM.
Starfleet Veteran
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 1,618
# 7
04-07-2013, 08:57 PM
Yeah. My biggest worry is the MoBo. I can only find the specs page from hp and its lacking in detail. Newegg says its compatable so I'll just have to trust them.
Actualy reading things pefore posting will make you look smarter than yelling loudly. Reading comprehension is aparently a lost art.

Not everything you see on the internet is true - Abriham Lincoln
Captain
Join Date: Sep 2012
Posts: 3,399
# 8
04-08-2013, 12:56 AM
hah, first upgrade you make on an oem machine is the power supply.
those generic things... lit fuses just waiting to kill every component connected to them. im not kidding around on that, they will kill your gear

ram is an easy enough upgrade, get the right stick and stack it in the slot. shouldnt cause too many issues even with a generic psu, but i wouldnt take the risk.

perchase order i use on new builds providing i have the case & peripherals.

1- the os
2- psu
3- cpu mobo bundle
4- cooling (heatsinks/fans)
5- ram
6- gfx card

in an upgrade from oem its pretty much the same because oem machines typically feature oem os licences that are locked to the main hdd the mobo and the cpu, where replacing either breaks/locks the os.

be aware of that in your upgrade path.
t6 cruiser? keep it, i'd rather have aux to dampers 3.
as it turns out, an intrepid would lose a fight with a connie.
and thats canon.
! the power of plot compels you.
Starfleet Veteran
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 1,618
# 9
04-08-2013, 01:01 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by skollulfr View Post
hah, first upgrade you make on an oem machine is the power supply.
those generic things... lit fuses just waiting to kill every component connected to them. im not kidding around on that, they will kill your gear

ram is an easy enough upgrade, get the right stick and stack it in the slot. shouldnt cause too many issues even with a generic psu, but i wouldnt take the risk.

perchase order i use on new builds providing i have the case & peripherals.

1- the os
2- psu
3- cpu mobo bundle
4- cooling (heatsinks/fans)
5- ram
6- gfx card

in an upgrade from oem its pretty much the same because oem machines typically feature oem os licences that are locked to the main hdd the mobo and the cpu, where replacing either breaks/locks the os.

be aware of that in your upgrade path.

I actualy already did.

Got a psu and gfx card at the same time. Its not a great gfx card but it does free up a little more ram from the onboard one I had.
Actualy reading things pefore posting will make you look smarter than yelling loudly. Reading comprehension is aparently a lost art.

Not everything you see on the internet is true - Abriham Lincoln
Captain
Join Date: Sep 2012
Posts: 3,399
# 10
04-08-2013, 01:20 AM
fair enough then.

once you have your ram getting a new hdd may be the next logical step.

one way or another it will give you more space, and if the original hdd has that horrible phoenix oem os recovery system(or whatever it was called), it can be the primary drive you install the os to when you put the new board in.

mobo cpu bundles may be a route for you to investigate.

but make sure your psu is rated to the stress you will be putting it under, as a rule i took the intended builds max draw & added 30% to the capacity of the psu i installed for people.
especially with the draw nvidia cards where starting to take a few years ago.
t6 cruiser? keep it, i'd rather have aux to dampers 3.
as it turns out, an intrepid would lose a fight with a connie.
and thats canon.
! the power of plot compels you.
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 09:43 PM.