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Career Officer
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 987
# 11
04-24-2013, 07:20 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by tacofangs View Post
The main problem I have with putting in the celestial objects seen in iconic images like the all too familiar Pillars of Creation, The Horsehead Nebula, The Hourglass Nebula, etc., is that they're all false color images. They usually assign certain colors to certain elements, or wavelengths which are invisible to the human eye.

The argument I hear in my head when I say that is, "But there are a billion brightly colored nebulae in the game already, what about those?" And while I partially agree, it can be argued that those are invented, and thus, who's to say those, fictitious nebulae, do not give off such visible light.
But the view in Sector space isn't a natural view, its an astrometrics representation.
Lieutenant
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 67
# 12
04-24-2013, 08:30 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by backyardserenade View Post
As I understand it, you also wouldn't probably see much of the Nebula if you are very close or in it. It might look like a bright object from afar (see Orion Nebula) but once in it, all the layers are far too thin-stretched to be overly impressive.

In that regard, most depictions of Nebulae in science fiction are probably very unrealistic (but yeah, it's hard to realize that with all the colorful images produced by astronomers that don't really depict reality).
Bad Astronomy had a video that covered the unrealistic depictions of nebula in science fiction. In a planetary nebula formed from the expanding mass ejected from a star, you would likely not notice being in the nebula. They did say that large molecular clouds like Orion should offer some interesting views, even within it. This would be due to the denser particles in portions of the structure.
Cryptic Studios Team
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 1,917
# 13
04-24-2013, 09:03 AM
Also keep in mind that very much like our "constellations" are meaningless from anywhere else in the galaxy, what we see as the Pillars of Creation (or others) wouldn't look the same from any other angle.

In addition, the insane size of these things means that they are only really observable from afar. Flying around inside of them would look like nothing. (http://www.opinionarlington.com/wp-c...n2-235x300.jpg - two of our solar systems would fit inside that little peak.) When you look up at clouds in the sky, some of them could be gorgeous, or shaped like bunnies and T-Rexes. But when you're in a plane, flying through those clouds, it all just looks grey. . .

I'm not a huge fan of how Sci-Fi has colored space the way it has, but it is standard now, and I don't forsee us changing that. I will also admit that it does make it all more interesting to fly around in.
-The Artist formerly known as Tumerboy



Quote:
Originally Posted by mightybobcnc View Post
Tacofangs, what is your beef with where's Sulu?
Career Officer
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 867
# 14
04-24-2013, 10:32 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by wanderintx View Post
Bad Astronomy had a video that covered the unrealistic depictions of nebula in science fiction. In a planetary nebula formed from the expanding mass ejected from a star, you would likely not notice being in the nebula. They did say that large molecular clouds like Orion should offer some interesting views, even within it. This would be due to the denser particles in portions of the structure.
I would have to look at his reasoning for not being able to see a planetary nebula, but the Orion Nebula is a stellar nursery and is tremendously large, so it would be hard to miss.

Emission nebulas get their unique colors mainly from the gasses electrons moving from excited states to less excited states, so the temperature gradient and element/molecular gradient of the cloud determines the "color".

I would imagine inside a big nebula all you would see would be a haze, like a foggy day in San Francisco or London. You would probably not see rolling clouds of many colors like you see on Star Trek.
Lieutenant
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 67
# 15
04-24-2013, 11:11 AM
Here is the Bad Astronomy video - http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/ba.../#.UXgeqsqGnWx

Mentions the Orion Nebula in the comments.
Commander
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 308
# 16
04-24-2013, 12:17 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by logicalspock View Post
Things that are in beautiful, bright hues in color composites look like grey or muted colors through a telescope.
But that's mainly due to how the human eye works. You have receptors that can distinguish between colors but those aren't sensitive enough to work in darkness. Which only leaves those receptors that still work in low-light environments. However, they can't detect different colors, which is why you'll only be able to see shades of grey. Essentially, humans are colorblind in darkness.
Career Officer
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 867
# 17
04-24-2013, 12:36 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by wanderintx View Post
Here is the Bad Astronomy video - http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/ba.../#.UXgeqsqGnWx

Mentions the Orion Nebula in the comments.
Interesting. He does not provide his calculations, but I suppose that is a challenge to others to do it themselves. Since I am not particularly interested in the subject, I will just defer to his authority. That being said, most of the nebulae depicted on Star Trek do not seem to be planetary nebulae, which have the telltale characteristic of being "rounded" or symmetric about a white-dwarf.




Quote:
Originally Posted by mrspidey2 View Post
But that's mainly due to how the human eye works. You have receptors that can distinguish between colors but those aren't sensitive enough to work in darkness. Which only leaves those receptors that still work in low-light environments. However, they can't detect different colors, which is why you'll only be able to see shades of grey. Essentially, humans are colorblind in darkness.
That certainly may be part of it, but I am suspicious that an equal or larger part of it is due to the fact that planetary nebulae are rarely hot enough to emit a continuous spectrum.

The Orion nebulae, by contrast, is probably more continuous due to the greater magnitude of light coming from the nascent stars themselves, which means it is more energetic and more colorful.
Captain
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 10,998
# 18
04-24-2013, 06:13 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by logicalspock View Post
Interesting. He does not provide his calculations, but I suppose that is a challenge to others to do it themselves. Since I am not particularly interested in the subject, I will just defer to his authority. That being said, most of the nebulae depicted on Star Trek do not seem to be planetary nebulae, which have the telltale characteristic of being "rounded" or symmetric about a white-dwarf.

That certainly may be part of it, but I am suspicious that an equal or larger part of it is due to the fact that planetary nebulae are rarely hot enough to emit a continuous spectrum.

The Orion nebulae, by contrast, is probably more continuous due to the greater magnitude of light coming from the nascent stars themselves, which means it is more energetic and more colorful.
Again, it depends on the type of Nebula. Besides, as I said before, the ship would be able to display the false colour versions.
http://i1151.photobucket.com/albums/o633/centersolace/189cux9khvl6ojpg_zpsca7ccff0.jpg

So inhumane superweapons, mass murder, and canon nonsense is okay, but speedos are too much for some people.
Career Officer
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 867
# 19
04-24-2013, 06:31 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by centersolace View Post
Again, it depends on the type of Nebula. Besides, as I said before, the ship would be able to display the false colour versions.
I suppose it would be, but in the game, we are looking at space from a third person view, not from the ships' view-screens.

In addition, there seems no easier way to date something than to try to use cutting edge scientific discoveries. Going back and watching the original series is a painful experience because of how they integrated science into the show, like stopping to observe "quasars".

That is not to say they did not make similar mistakes with later shows, like "dark matter nebulae" .
Rihannsu
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 12,065
# 20
04-24-2013, 06:54 PM
Dark Matter Nebulas might exist.... well, if Dark Matter exists.....
HAIL HYDRA!

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