Captain
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 1,271
# 11
06-01-2014, 04:42 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by kuntel View Post
OOC: Uhm, hello?

[OOC]Sorry - had an emergency trip out of town and just got back. Will post more later - now at work...@_@. Besides, I'm enjoying what you're writing LOL [/OOC]
Captain
Join Date: Apr 2014
Posts: 11,190
# 12
06-01-2014, 04:45 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by prierin View Post
[OOC]Sorry - had an emergency trip out of town and just got back. Will post more later - now at work...@_@. Besides, I'm enjoying what you're writing LOL [/OOC]
OOC: I was starting to think this thread was dead! Hope everything was fine with your trip though.
Captain
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 1,271
# 13
06-02-2014, 07:59 PM
Aiel sat down at the mess table and gave a little prayer. She wasn’t entirely sure why she did this. A habit picked up from her adoptive parents, she assumed. She, herself, had no faith of which to speak. No deity to worship and nothing to place full, blind faith in other than herself, and she often felt that faith slipping at times as well. She was so caught up in her thoughts she hadn’t realized two other cadets had taken a seat at her table until she looked up to see them staring at her with blank smiles. One was a human, Asian, Aiel assumed, given the dark, close-cropped hair, caramel colored skin and rich, brown eyes partially hidden by the fold of skin in the corners. The other was an alien Aiel did not recognize. Much taller than Aiel or the human, even seated, her long arms, neck and elongated head towered over them, her skin a soft but rich deep lavender, her bright, white hair arranged around what Aiel assumed was a ceremonial head crest of her people. Deep, reflective eyes stared at Aiel as she stared back at them. Finally the human broke the awkward silence.

“Kagome Takahasi.” she said with a lilt in her voice, “Third year cadet. This is Xia, second year, but don’t let that fool you. She’s light years ahead of even the senior cadets here.”

“Greetings.” Said Xia, still offering that awkward smile.

Aiel continued to stare, unsure of how to respond to this sudden invasion of her privacy. Kagome, recognizing the heavy pause, glanced to Xia, then back to Aiel.
“You’re Romulan, aren’t you?” She asked, “You’re Aiel…”

“How do you know my name?” Aiel blurted. It was purely reflexive and came out much harsher than she had intended. Given the startled reaction of the others, they were equally unprepared for her sudden eruption. Kagome blinked, then gathered her tray and stood.

“We’re sorry to disturb you meal.” Xia followed suit, rising to her full height of seven foot three inches.

“I’m sorry… please sit.” Aiel uttered, feeling wholly ashamed of herself. Kagome glanced to Xia, then slowly took her seat. “We meant no offense.” she offered, but Aiel waved her off. “You’re not the one who should apologize. I had no right to speak to you in that manner.”

Kagome smiled. “Let’s start over. My name is Kagome. This is Xia.”

Aiel allowed herself a brief smile.

-- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- --

“Hull breaches on decks seven through twelve! Structural integrity fields failing! Auxiliary subsystems down!”

“They’re coming about for another run! Your orders, sir?!”

Aiel bit her lip. The cacophony of klaxons, panicked screaming and relays exploding tinged with the smell of burned ozone was overwhelming. The Bird of Prey had de-cloaked and opened fire without any warning whatsoever. By the time Aiel had ordered the shields raised their hull had already suffered significant damage. Now it seemed the Klingons were coming in to deliver the final blow and Aiel had yet to fire a single shot.

“Engineering to the bridge. Come in, Captain!” Kagome’s familiar voice rang over the speaker. Aiel and she grown close over the past few months, commiserating over the familiar sting of growing up as an adopted child. Xia, on the other hand, was one of three hundred and six siblings. A Celestian, as Aiel had come to learn of Xia’s lineage, has no single parent. An entire colony’s group of matriarchs will care for the combined offspring of that colony and each are raised as family. When born, a Celestian has no gender identification of their own. As they approach puberty and their bodies begin to change, they decide whether or not to become male or female. Those who opt to become female, as Xia had, often become the dominant aggressives of the species, whereas the males will assume the more domestic duties often associated with the females of other species. They were fortunate enough to be assigned to the same crew under Aiel’s command. However, as the Klingon turned in a wide arc and began to bear down upon them again, it seemed that their fortune had reached its end.

“Aiel, come in!” Kagome repeated.

“Give me some good news, Kagome.” Aiel spoke, trying to mask her nerves.

“I wish I could. The disruptor blasts we suffered during the initial strafing shook the core coupling out of alignment. We’re seeping power and plasma. If we can’t contain the leak in the next five minutes we’ll be facing a complete core breach.”

Aiel glanced at the Bird of Prey on her view screen. In any other circumstance she may have admired its raw beauty and sheer power. Staring down the barrels of its plasma cannons, however, have her a very different perspective. “The good news is we won’t have to worry about that breach. If we don’t get our weapons and shields back online we won’t last that long. Can you give me any power whatsoever?”

“Not without sending the core into a critical cascading failure.” She offered, “Even if we somehow managed to disable the Klingons, our victory would be very short-lived, no pun intended.”

Aiel spat. She had been in command only for a week now. This was her first mission beyond the Sirius Block. Why hadn’t they detected the cloaked ship? Not that it mattered at this point.

“Eject the core.” She said calmly.

“Sir?” Kagome asked.

“Do it.” Aiel turned towards the tactical officer, “When the core is free from the ship, lock phasers and fire. We might as well take this bastard out with us when we go.”

Xia turned from her station at the sciences console. “Sir, I may have another option. If we can concentrate our entire shield strength to the prow and initiate a sustained burst of the impulse engines we may be able to disable the Klingon ship upon impact.”

“And what’s to stop them from tearing at our shields before we reach them?”

“That will be a calculated risk. Additionally, in order to reroute sufficient power to the shields and engines as well as reinforce the structural dampeners, the inertial dampeners themselves will go offline. We will undoubtedly suffer some heavy injuries and perhaps even some casualties, but we would be alive to request assistance from Starfleet as our medical teams treat the wounded.”

Aiel weighed the alternative in her mind. “You said it would disable the Klingon ship, not destroy it.”

“That is correct, Captain.” Xia offered.

“How badly?”

“Sir?”

“Two disabled ships. It would be a race, victory to whomever was able to bring their weapons back online first. What are the chances we’d come out alive using your alternative?”

“Approximately two hundred thousand, one hundred sixty one against.” Xia rattled off without pause.

“And with my plan?”

“Considerably less in our favor.”

The bridge rattled under plasma fire as the Klingon Bird of Prey closed in. They were out of time. Aiel pressed the call button on her chair. “Eject the core.”

The safety hatches on the aft section of the ship exploded outward, followed by the early quarter of a mile long warp core with enough force to jettison it away from the ship and towards the oncoming enemy vessel. The Klingons ceased firing and attempted to break off their attack but just then Aiel’s ship fired its phasers, striking the core dead-center. It erupted in a brilliant white thermonuclear blast, the shockwave of which caught the Bird of Preys bow, shredding the armored plating and snapping the neck, resulting in an explosion of its own which left the ship nothing more than scattered debris.

“The Klingon ship is destroyed, Sir,” the Tactical officer reported.

Aiel grinned. She had won. After everything they had faced, she had snatched victory from the closing jaws of defeat.

“The blast wave from the Klingon’s explosion has altered the forced direction of the core. Impact in ten seconds.” Xia looked up from her station, emotionless.

“Shields!”

“No can do, Captain.” The tactical officer offered, “the ejection of the core has left us without sufficient power for even manoeuvring thrusters, let alone anything for the shields. Pardon the expression, but we’re dead in the water.”

Aiel looked at the fiery mass of undulating energy screaming towards them. She sat back in her chair and shook her head. “So close this time, too.”

The bridge shook again as it was engulfed by a white light.

The light faded. The klaxons went quiet. Overhead lights came on, exposing the bridge for what it was: a training simulator. The bridge crew left their stations and moved toward the exit. Xia looked over her shoulder to Aiel, still slumped in her chair, then exited with the others.

Aiel counted down on her hand… four… three… two… one.

“Cadet L’lwyn please report to the Training Officer.”


“So tell me, in clear, concise words, what you were thinking by ejecting the core in the middle of a firefight?” Lieutenant Mavis stared at Aiel over her glasses and awaited a response. Aiel took in a deep breath, released it, then asked, “Why were we unable to detect the cloaked ship, Lieutenant?”

“I don’t understand what this has to do with your report, cadet.” Mavis blinked.

“Our sensors were tuned to pick up any discrepancies and subspace anomalies, including concentrated tachyon radiation surges and power spikes. We should have seen that Klingon ship and had time to react. Why didn’t we?” Aiel looked to her superior calmly and expectantly.

Mavis adjusted her glasses. “The nature of this debriefing, cadet, is to go over your actions as acting Captain during the simulation, not to enquire about the specifics of the programs parameters.”

“So you don’t know either.” Aiel spoke matter-of-factly. “Don’t you find it odd?”

“Cadet, are you going to provide me with a report or not?” Mavis said flatly.

Aiel shrugged. “Does it really matter? We were ambushed by a predator we should have seen coming. We may have lost a fair fight but in the end it would have been just that – a fair fight. If the programmers feel they need to cheat to ensure their victory over ours then what does it really matter what decision I or any Captain makes in the end? Ejecting the core at least ensured the destruction of the Klingon ship. In the end it was as good a decision as any, given the circumstances. Wouldn’t you agree, Lieutenant?”

Mavis blinked. She wanted to reprimand Aiel for her brazen attitude but in the end, she was right. Mavis cleared her throat. “The exercise is designed to see how you act as Captain under the direct threat of catastrophic failure. Had you detected the Klingon vessel, the exercise would have been a failure.”

“What’s the point? I mean, in a real situation the odds may be stacked against you but at least there isn’t someone deliberately trying to go out of their way to ensure you fail. If I make a mistake as Captain and my crew gets injured or worse, killed, I’ll take the blame. I’ll wear that and deal with it as I have to,” Aiel felt the anger rising in her voice. She took a breath to calm herself before continuing. “but to know that no matter what I do my crew is going to die anyway… I can’t accept that. I won’t accept that. If that is worth my role as acting Captain then I’ll accept security detail for all it would matter in the end.”

Mavis tapped her fingers across her desk. A thousands responses flashed through her mind, all of them useless. Finally, she decided on simply uttering, “Dismissed” and turned her attention to a stack of papers.

Aiel stood, saluted, and turned to the exit. She paused, turned back. “Lieutenant, if I may ask, what would you have done?”

“Failed.” Mavis said without look up from her paperwork.


-- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- --

[OOC] More to come later….[/OOC]
Captain
Join Date: Apr 2014
Posts: 11,190
# 14
06-02-2014, 08:33 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by prierin View Post
Aiel sat down at the mess table and gave a little prayer. She wasn’t entirely sure why she did this. A habit picked up from her adoptive parents, she assumed. She, herself, had no faith of which to speak. No deity to worship and nothing to place full, blind faith in other than herself, and she often felt that faith slipping at times as well. She was so caught up in her thoughts she hadn’t realized two other cadets had taken a seat at her table until she looked up to see them staring at her with blank smiles. One was a human, Asian, Aiel assumed, given the dark, close-cropped hair, caramel colored skin and rich, brown eyes partially hidden by the fold of skin in the corners. The other was an alien Aiel did not recognize. Much taller than Aiel or the human, even seated, her long arms, neck and elongated head towered over them, her skin a soft but rich deep lavender, her bright, white hair arranged around what Aiel assumed was a ceremonial head crest of her people. Deep, reflective eyes stared at Aiel as she stared back at them. Finally the human broke the awkward silence.

“Kagome Takahasi.” she said with a lilt in her voice, “Third year cadet. This is Xia, second year, but don’t let that fool you. She’s light years ahead of even the senior cadets here.”

“Greetings.” Said Xia, still offering that awkward smile.

Aiel continued to stare, unsure of how to respond to this sudden invasion of her privacy. Kagome, recognizing the heavy pause, glanced to Xia, then back to Aiel.
“You’re Romulan, aren’t you?” She asked, “You’re Aiel…”

“How do you know my name?” Aiel blurted. It was purely reflexive and came out much harsher than she had intended. Given the startled reaction of the others, they were equally unprepared for her sudden eruption. Kagome blinked, then gathered her tray and stood.

“We’re sorry to disturb you meal.” Xia followed suit, rising to her full height of seven foot three inches.

“I’m sorry… please sit.” Aiel uttered, feeling wholly ashamed of herself. Kagome glanced to Xia, then slowly took her seat. “We meant no offense.” she offered, but Aiel waved her off. “You’re not the one who should apologize. I had no right to speak to you in that manner.”

Kagome smiled. “Let’s start over. My name is Kagome. This is Xia.”

Aiel allowed herself a brief smile.

-- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- --

“Hull breaches on decks seven through twelve! Structural integrity fields failing! Auxiliary subsystems down!”

“They’re coming about for another run! Your orders, sir?!”

Aiel bit her lip. The cacophony of klaxons, panicked screaming and relays exploding tinged with the smell of burned ozone was overwhelming. The Bird of Prey had de-cloaked and opened fire without any warning whatsoever. By the time Aiel had ordered the shields raised their hull had already suffered significant damage. Now it seemed the Klingons were coming in to deliver the final blow and Aiel had yet to fire a single shot.

“Engineering to the bridge. Come in, Captain!” Kagome’s familiar voice rang over the speaker. Aiel and she grown close over the past few months, commiserating over the familiar sting of growing up as an adopted child. Xia, on the other hand, was one of three hundred and six siblings. A Celestian, as Aiel had come to learn of Xia’s lineage, has no single parent. An entire colony’s group of matriarchs will care for the combined offspring of that colony and each are raised as family. When born, a Celestian has no gender identification of their own. As they approach puberty and their bodies begin to change, they decide whether or not to become male or female. Those who opt to become female, as Xia had, often become the dominant aggressives of the species, whereas the males will assume the more domestic duties often associated with the females of other species. They were fortunate enough to be assigned to the same crew under Aiel’s command. However, as the Klingon turned in a wide arc and began to bear down upon them again, it seemed that their fortune had reached its end.

“Aiel, come in!” Kagome repeated.

“Give me some good news, Kagome.” Aiel spoke, trying to mask her nerves.

“I wish I could. The disruptor blasts we suffered during the initial strafing shook the core coupling out of alignment. We’re seeping power and plasma. If we can’t contain the leak in the next five minutes we’ll be facing a complete core breach.”

Aiel glanced at the Bird of Prey on her view screen. In any other circumstance she may have admired its raw beauty and sheer power. Staring down the barrels of its plasma cannons, however, have her a very different perspective. “The good news is we won’t have to worry about that breach. If we don’t get our weapons and shields back online we won’t last that long. Can you give me any power whatsoever?”

“Not without sending the core into a critical cascading failure.” She offered, “Even if we somehow managed to disable the Klingons, our victory would be very short-lived, no pun intended.”

Aiel spat. She had been in command only for a week now. This was her first mission beyond the Sirius Block. Why hadn’t they detected the cloaked ship? Not that it mattered at this point.

“Eject the core.” She said calmly.

“Sir?” Kagome asked.

“Do it.” Aiel turned towards the tactical officer, “When the core is free from the ship, lock phasers and fire. We might as well take this bastard out with us when we go.”

Xia turned from her station at the sciences console. “Sir, I may have another option. If we can concentrate our entire shield strength to the prow and initiate a sustained burst of the impulse engines we may be able to disable the Klingon ship upon impact.”

“And what’s to stop them from tearing at our shields before we reach them?”

“That will be a calculated risk. Additionally, in order to reroute sufficient power to the shields and engines as well as reinforce the structural dampeners, the inertial dampeners themselves will go offline. We will undoubtedly suffer some heavy injuries and perhaps even some casualties, but we would be alive to request assistance from Starfleet as our medical teams treat the wounded.”

Aiel weighed the alternative in her mind. “You said it would disable the Klingon ship, not destroy it.”

“That is correct, Captain.” Xia offered.

“How badly?”

“Sir?”

“Two disabled ships. It would be a race, victory to whomever was able to bring their weapons back online first. What are the chances we’d come out alive using your alternative?”

“Approximately two hundred thousand, one hundred sixty one against.” Xia rattled off without pause.

“And with my plan?”

“Considerably less in our favor.”

The bridge rattled under plasma fire as the Klingon Bird of Prey closed in. They were out of time. Aiel pressed the call button on her chair. “Eject the core.”

The safety hatches on the aft section of the ship exploded outward, followed by the early quarter of a mile long warp core with enough force to jettison it away from the ship and towards the oncoming enemy vessel. The Klingons ceased firing and attempted to break off their attack but just then Aiel’s ship fired its phasers, striking the core dead-center. It erupted in a brilliant white thermonuclear blast, the shockwave of which caught the Bird of Preys bow, shredding the armored plating and snapping the neck, resulting in an explosion of its own which left the ship nothing more than scattered debris.

“The Klingon ship is destroyed, Sir,” the Tactical officer reported.

Aiel grinned. She had won. After everything they had faced, she had snatched victory from the closing jaws of defeat.

“The blast wave from the Klingon’s explosion has altered the forced direction of the core. Impact in ten seconds.” Xia looked up from her station, emotionless.

“Shields!”

“No can do, Captain.” The tactical officer offered, “the ejection of the core has left us without sufficient power for even manoeuvring thrusters, let alone anything for the shields. Pardon the expression, but we’re dead in the water.”

Aiel looked at the fiery mass of undulating energy screaming towards them. She sat back in her chair and shook her head. “So close this time, too.”

The bridge shook again as it was engulfed by a white light.

The light faded. The klaxons went quiet. Overhead lights came on, exposing the bridge for what it was: a training simulator. The bridge crew left their stations and moved toward the exit. Xia looked over her shoulder to Aiel, still slumped in her chair, then exited with the others.

Aiel counted down on her hand… four… three… two… one.

“Cadet L’lwyn please report to the Training Officer.”


“So tell me, in clear, concise words, what you were thinking by ejecting the core in the middle of a firefight?” Lieutenant Mavis stared at Aiel over her glasses and awaited a response. Aiel took in a deep breath, released it, then asked, “Why were we unable to detect the cloaked ship, Lieutenant?”

“I don’t understand what this has to do with your report, cadet.” Mavis blinked.

“Our sensors were tuned to pick up any discrepancies and subspace anomalies, including concentrated tachyon radiation surges and power spikes. We should have seen that Klingon ship and had time to react. Why didn’t we?” Aiel looked to her superior calmly and expectantly.

Mavis adjusted her glasses. “The nature of this debriefing, cadet, is to go over your actions as acting Captain during the simulation, not to enquire about the specifics of the programs parameters.”

“So you don’t know either.” Aiel spoke matter-of-factly. “Don’t you find it odd?”

“Cadet, are you going to provide me with a report or not?” Mavis said flatly.

Aiel shrugged. “Does it really matter? We were ambushed by a predator we should have seen coming. We may have lost a fair fight but in the end it would have been just that – a fair fight. If the programmers feel they need to cheat to ensure their victory over ours then what does it really matter what decision I or any Captain makes in the end? Ejecting the core at least ensured the destruction of the Klingon ship. In the end it was as good a decision as any, given the circumstances. Wouldn’t you agree, Lieutenant?”

Mavis blinked. She wanted to reprimand Aiel for her brazen attitude but in the end, she was right. Mavis cleared her throat. “The exercise is designed to see how you act as Captain under the direct threat of catastrophic failure. Had you detected the Klingon vessel, the exercise would have been a failure.”

“What’s the point? I mean, in a real situation the odds may be stacked against you but at least there isn’t someone deliberately trying to go out of their way to ensure you fail. If I make a mistake as Captain and my crew gets injured or worse, killed, I’ll take the blame. I’ll wear that and deal with it as I have to,” Aiel felt the anger rising in her voice. She took a breath to calm herself before continuing. “but to know that no matter what I do my crew is going to die anyway… I can’t accept that. I won’t accept that. If that is worth my role as acting Captain then I’ll accept security detail for all it would matter in the end.”

Mavis tapped her fingers across her desk. A thousands responses flashed through her mind, all of them useless. Finally, she decided on simply uttering, “Dismissed” and turned her attention to a stack of papers.

Aiel stood, saluted, and turned to the exit. She paused, turned back. “Lieutenant, if I may ask, what would you have done?”

“Failed.” Mavis said without look up from her paperwork.


-- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- --

[OOC] More to come later….[/OOC]
OOC: Sadly, my computer has broken. I hope you will forgive any mis spellings on my part.

Stelam wakes up, not knowing where he was. When he looks around, he realizes where he was.

"Why am I in the Captains..." he trails off as the memories hit him.

He then starts to sob. He does not cry, he hasn't for years. He stops dry heaving a few minutes later, and gets up. His new quarters have a bedroom off of the main room. He walks into the main room, which consists of a couch, a viewscreen, some wall decorations, a desk, and a console. His previous rooms affects are arranged in a corner.

After taking inventory to check if everything was there, he starts to arrange it into the room. When done with that, he gets dressed and moves to the bridge. The crew salute as he walks on, waving a hand of dismissal.


"Gerrard, status report." Stelam orders.

"All of your orders have been carried out sir. I have rearranged the crew, and the ship has been repaired to the utmost possibility. I would suggest that we return to port to repair to full and pick up more supplies and crew." Gerrard answers.

"And sell the loot. Did you salvage the remains if the ship?" Stelam asks.

Gerrard nods.

"Good. Set course to New Haven, Delea." Stelam says.

Delea, a tall Orion girl, nods and says " Aye, Capn'. Layin' in the course now.

"Well, punch it then. I don't need to order you to do everything!" Stelam says with a smile on his face.

Delea smiles and punches it.
Captain
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 1,271
# 15
06-03-2014, 12:45 AM
[OOC] Sorry – here’s the continuation…[/OOC]

Aiel watched the crowd at the notice board at the end of the hall, all eagerly searching for their names identifying their various assignments. It had been a gruelling four years and she bore the scars, both physically and mentally, for each of them. In such a short amount of time she had managed to find her place in the top ten percent of her class in weapons training, armed and unarmed combat, shuttle piloting and tactical analysis. Despite the various challenges thrown at her she had found a way to overcome them all. Still, she made no effort to join the others at the board. She didn’t need to. She found out everything she needed to know five weeks earlier.

“You won’t find your name on the assignments list.” Drake warned her as they walked along an eerily empty corridor. “It’s not that you are not qualified for assignment to a starship,” he continued.

“Lieutenant Mavis recommended I be held back from the duty roster.” Aiel interrupted, “Her notes were pretty specific. A capable fighter and remarkable cadet but unsuitable for command at this stage.” Aiel recited from memory. “My full recommendation is that she be retained to the academy for at least two more years in the hopes that she begin to grasp the unfathomable burden of commanding a starship.”

Drake chuckled. “You hacked into Mavis’ personnel records?”

“No, sir.” Aiel said blankly, “I hacked into yours.”

Drake stopped and regarded her again. Had he underestimated this Romulan orphan all this time? “You do realize that tapping into the files of a senior officer, let alone one of my rank, is not only grounds for immediate dismissal from the Academy but a five year sentence to the brig?”

“Yes.” she began, “That is precisely why I hacked yours and not Lieutenant Mavis’s.” She turned to him with a slight cocky smile. “She’d have reported me. I knew you, on the other hand, wouldn’t.”
“Then you undoubtedly saw my response, did you not?”

She shook her head. “I assumed you would agree with her so I didn’t bother.”

They arrived at a turbolift at the end of the hall. The doors opened automatically and they entered. “Deck seventeen.” Drake commanded. The life responded accordingly. “You should not always make such wide assumptions. In fact, I haven’t responded to her yet at all.”
“Sir?”

“Mavis is correct. You lack certain qualities which would make you suitable for the command of a Federation starship. You are brash, reckless, hot-headed and tend to overcommit yourself when facing overwhelming odds.”

“Thank you for the compliment, Sir.” She said sardonically.


“Let me finish. You are not Federation material. However, that which would hold you back in Starfleet would serve you well in another organization. One which serves the same principles as Starfleet, adheres to the same Prime Directive, but operates in a shadow capacity. Veisae nnearh Rihan?”
“Mnek'nra.” She responded immediately.

“Your accent still comes through somewhat. Lower your voice slightly. Speak with innate authority.”

“I still find it odd being corrected on my Romulan by a Human, no offense.” She mused.

“None taken. I’d find it equally odd to be corrected on my French by a Klingon. That being said, you’ll need to speak Romulan as if it has been your native tongue all your life.”

The lift came to a stop and the doors opened. Drake moved forward, his hands clasped behind his back in his familiar fashion. Aiel gave pause, realizing she did not recognize this area whatsoever. There were none of the familiar markings on the wall or floors to indicate the level and no personnel whatsoever other than she and Drake.

“Are you coming, cadet?” Drake asked, not pausing in the slightest.

“What did you mean by that?” She asked, catching up to him, “That I will need to speak Romulan as if I had been all my life?”

“Ever since the Hobus disaster destroyed Romulus and scattered your people across the galaxy it has been increasingly difficult to monitor the comings and goings of relatively high-levelled members. We have been watching a few, D’tan, for one, as they attempt to reconstruct what once was lost as well as those who would seek to destroy it.”
“Sela.” Aiel muttered.

“Indeed,” Drake continued. “and a few more. The ever-present problem is that despite the assistance offered by both the Federation and the Klingon Defence Force the Romulan people are stull guarded and suspicious of outsiders. Even of Romulans who have aligned themselves with either of these two forces.”

Aiel arched an eyebrow. “So if I were, for example, a Starfleet officer, even I would be distrusted by my own people?”

“If you heard rumours of involvement by the Federation or KDF in the very apocalypse which shattered your home world, would you trust a Romulan in either uniform?” Drake asked. They came to a stop at an unmarked door. “Drake alpha zero zero Delta.”

“Voice pattern recognized,” came an electronic voice from the door. “Prepare for genetic verification.”

Drake stood perfectly still as a beam of light shone down and scanned his entire body from head to foot and reverse.

“Genetic pattern verified. Secondary personnel detected. Species, Romulan. Female. Please state your name.”

“Um…” She stuttered. Drake nodded to her to continue. “Aiel L’lwyn.”

“Do you wish to store Aiel L’lwyn’s genetic profile?”

“Yes.” Drake uttered.

“Prepare for genetic recording. Please hold still for the scan.”

Aiel froze as the light washed over her. She knew there was no real physical sensation with the scan but the thought that this light was looking at her on a genetic level made her feel uneasy and, for some reason, made her nose itch. Finally the scan ended and Aiel allowed herself to scratch the tip of her nose.
“Genetic pattern stored, security protocol one echo. Secondary personnel admitted only with the presence of a senior officer with alpha omega one clearance.”

The doors opened. Drake made a sweeping gesture. “After you.”


-- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- --

“Hello! Earth to Aiel!”

Aiel shook her head and was pulled from her reverie by Kagome’s waving hands. “I’m sorry, what?”

“I said I’m going to file an official complaint against Mavis. That battle-axe has had it out for you since you started! Now she’s held you back from graduating with your class.” Kagome’s face was flushed with genuine anger.

Xia blinked, her reflective eyes displaying no emotion whatsoever. “I believe the correct term to use is, damn her to hell.”

Aiel couldn’t help it; she broke into laughter. Kagome stared at her, then felt herself laughing as well. “You sound like a Vulcan when you talk like that, Zee.” If Xia was offended or amused by the comparison, she made no visible effort to acknowledge the fact.

“It’s alright.” Aiel said, “I was already told I wouldn’t make it on the board and no, it’s not Mavis’s fault. Entirely. What ship did you guys get?”

“Ironically we both found ourselves stationed aboard the Warburton, a refitted constitution class.” Xia responded.

“An oldie but a goodie, apparently.” Kagome added, “New warp core, dutronium hull plating and auto-modulating phaser arrays. As far as shields go, they’re pretty standard but I’m thinking of tweaking them with a multiphasic regulating algorithm, see if we can boost their base strength somewhat.”

“Let me guess. Chief engineer and sciences officer.” Aiel grinned.

“I wish.” Kagome rolled her eyes, “Ensign Takahashi here to scrub the commodes and realign the replicator coils, sir! Although Zee here did get assigned to the bridge crew.”

Aiel beamed. “Congratulations!”

“Thank you, sir.” Xia offered, “but I would much rather be serving under you.”

“You don’t have to call me ‘sir’ any more, Zee. In fact, you outrank me now. I should be saluting you.”

Xia blinked at her emotionlessly. “I would rather you did not.”

Kagome shook her head and laid a hand upon Aiel’s shoulder. “Give us the word and we’ll refuse our posts.”

Aiel narrowed her eyes. “What are you talking about?”

“If you’re staying behind, we’re staying behind. We’re a team.” Kagome began.

“And you are our captain.” Xia finished, then added “Sir.”

Aiel felt a sudden rush of emotion. She never had friends growing up and didn’t expect to find any here in the academy, let alone two of the closest friends she would ever know. She shook her head firmly. “No. I refuse to hold either of you back. Take your posts and enjoy your new careers.”

Kagome opened her mouth to argue. “That’s an order.” Aiel quickly added. “I’ll be on the observation deck to see you off before…” Aiel bit down. She couldn’t believe she was almost so reckless.

“Tell no one of your assignment.” Drake had instructed her. “No one. The more that know only lessen the chance of success and heighten the chance of your capture or worse.”

“Before what?” Kagome enquired.

“Before I return to my studies.” Aiel quickly recovered. Thankful that an announcement chime came over the comm before either of them could question them further.

“Cadets. Upon reviewing your placements please report to your quarters and prepare for departure to your assigned ships. All cadets are required to report to the main shuttle bay by seventeen hundred hours for a final debriefing. All shuttles depart by seventeen thirty. That is all.”

Kagome gave another pleading look to Aiel, then pulled her into a deep embrace. “Write! No matter what. The first chance at shore leave we get we’ll head to Risa!”

“Okay, okay.” Aiel laughed. As Kagome released her, Xia placed both hands on Aiel’s shoulders and offered a warm smile. “May the fortune of our ancestors warm us all and keep us in their safe embrace.” She then proceeded to lean down and kiss Aiel deeply.

The first time this had happened Aiel had panicked, not sure exactly what was going on. Celestians, she later discovered, like Vulcans, supress their emotions. Unlike Vulcans, they reserve their emotions for very specific and very personal moments with those whom they feel particularly close. There was nothing sexual in the act between Xia and herself and Aiel knew this. It was merely Xia’s way of saying ‘I’ll miss you’.

As the two parted Aiel smiled and caressed Xia’s hand. “And may the ancestors carry us each into the eternal seas.” She offered a slight bow then smiled. “Now get going. You don’t want to miss your shuttles.”

Kagome gave her friend one final silent offer of desertion, to which Aiel simply shook her head in response, then the two shipmates turned and walked away, leaving Aiel alone in the corridor. It was a feeling she knew she’d have to get used to, being alone. She’d keep her promise of watching their departure from the observation deck. After which, she’d begin her own journey. One which began with leaving Starfleet.

Last edited by prierin; 06-03-2014 at 12:48 AM.
Captain
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 1,271
# 16
06-03-2014, 10:06 PM
[OOC]I’ll start writing more brief scenes now that the character back history is established. If anyone wants to join in at this point (on New Romulus) feel free. [/OOC]

The shuttle touched down in the Staging Area with a gentle bump. The engines whirred as they forced excess heat exhaust through the vents and soon the few other passengers began to collect their belongings and prepare to disembark. Aiel retrieved her simple satchel containing everything she now owned in the world and stood in line with the others as the doors opened.

Aiel took her fest step onto New Romulus and allowed the heat from the sun to wash over her as the scent of strange, native plants filled her nostrils. This was the closest she had ever been to actually stepping foot on Romulan soil. She wondered if Romulus smelled anything like this before the Hobus disaster. The moment was shattered as a Caitain refugee pushes her aside with a gruff “outta my way!” She sighed, repositioned her satchel on her shoulder, and followed the other new arrivals to Processing.

“State your name, system and planet of origin.” A male Romulan asked flatly in Galactic Standard without even looking up from his paperwork.

“Aiel L’lwyn. Sol. Earth.” She responded.

“What is the purpose of your visit?”

“I am not here to visit. I have come home.” She offered.

He looked up to her, regarding her with a combination of curiosity and suspicion. “Home? What makes you think this is your home?”

“Rhhae’a Rihanha. Aihr arham ei'krih.” She said. I am Romulan. This is my home.

“Pretty words from a tangled tongue.” He quipped. “You haven’t even been speaking the language for long and yet you call this place home? How presumptuous.” He quickly stamped a note in her papers and handed them back to her. As she took them, he tightened his grip. “You will have to do more than merely be greenblooded to call this haven home, girl. Much more.”

Aiel could feel her temper starting to rise. She tore the papers from his grip and stared him down. “Are we finished here?”

He glared at her with tangible disdain and contempt then gave a curt nod. “Report to Foreman Kylor for temporary housing and your work roster. As I said, if you want to call this home you’ll have to learn to work for it.”

She turned away from the little man and walked in the direction he had nodded. She allowed herself to slow her gait somewhat to take in the scene in greater detail. A flurry of people, both Romulan and Alien alike, were busy with their individual tasks and duties, some conducting simple scans and basic maintenance, others hurriedly rushing up the stone stairway leading to the Great Embassy, a monolithic building which towered over everything else. Aiel considered this building as the obvious great achievement of New Romulus to date and assumed that somewhere within its halls sat D’Tan going over the daily reports and planning the future of the colony as a whole.

Her attention was torn from this building by the sound of young men and women in mid-argument. Apparently, from what she could glean from the rushed, heightened voices screaming over one another, one of the few Ferengi present had procured a set of tools somehow and was auctioning them to the highest bidder when the owner of said tools, a Human man with a dark beard, appeared to accuse the Ferengi of theft.

“You stole them from me and now you have the audacity to offer to sell them back?” Yelled the Human.

“I stole nothing.” Said the Ferengi in the usual cocky manner befitting a master barterer. “I merely happened upon a set of tools lying abandoned in the street. What do you expect of me, to just leave them there to rot? This way you get your tools back and I make a few scraps in exchange. It’s a win-win.”

“For who?” Demanded the Human, his face flushing red. “Not for me! I already paid for those tools once and you expect me to pay for the same tools again?”

The Ferengi turned away from the Human and addressed the others who had gathered at the sound of the excitement. “If you aren’t going to bid on them then stop wasting my time. Who will give me four credits for this fine set of tools? Do I see four? Yes, you in the back for four! Do I see five? Five credits?”

Several feet from the goings on, Aiel noticed, stood a trio of Romulans in the uniform of Civil Law. They shook their heads and went about their own business, only looking up occasionally to show their displeasure that the argument had grown so loud as to force them to lean in closer to one another in order to carry on their own conversation.

That’s it! Give me my tools you little thief!” Screamed the man as he reached for the Ferengi. Immediately, a tall, powerful Gorn who had somehow managed to remain hidden in the shadows stood and closed a clawed talon on the Human’s shoulder, pulling him back.

The Ferengi looked to the Human, then to the Gorn. “T’liss, why don’t you take our friend here down to the river and help him cool down?”

T’liss lifted the Human and effortlessly tossed him over his shoulder, then marched off to fulfil his orders. The Ferengi gave a crooked, toothy smile before turning to the others. “Where were we? Yes, five! I have five credits to the man in the back. Do I hear seven? Surely these tools are worth much more in the hands of fine artisans such as yourselves. Who will be the lucky one of you to call them your own?”

Aiel watched the Human dangle helplessly over the Gorn’s shoulder as he was taken to whatever fate awaited him by the river, then continued towards the elevated stage where Foreman Kylor spoke to other new arrivals.

“You’ll find the housing in the Risu quarter fair and clean.” Kylor was speaking to a young Human couple. “Rent will be due every fifth of the month. Keep your duty rosters on you and be sure to have the team leaders sign off at the end of each day to receive rental assistance credit for work completed. We believe in fairness here; work hard and you will be rewarded. Welcome to New Romulus and please enjoy your stay.”

The two moved off. Kylor turned to Aiel and smiled. “Welcome home, young one. May I see your arrival documentation”

She handed him her papers, subconsciously noting how he spoke, with a warm familiarity and gentleness leagues apart from the man she had dealt with stepping off from the shuttle. He was tall for a Romulan, his elegantly pointed ears framed by short greying hair. His eyes were a soft steely grey that regarded her, and all new arrivals regardless of species, with the same welcoming glint of promise and honesty. Aiel had never met one of her own kind quite like this before and wasn’t entirely certain why this affected her so.

She was so caught up in her thoughts she almost didn’t realized he had asked her a direct question. “I’m sorry, what?” She shook her head.

“It’s been a long trip, I understand.” He chuckled. “I merely asked how long you intend to remain here on New Romulus?”

“To be perfectly honest, I’d like to make it my home.” She lied.

“I see.” He said, his voice still warm. “Well, we are always happy to welcome our lost starlings back to the nest. Of course, there will be plenty of work to do. A new colony has more than its fair share of broken plasma conduits, burned out relays and the like. And then there’s always lending a hand in the various fields throughout the valley. You’re not against the idea of working with your hands, I trust.”

“No, sir.” She said. “Not at all.”

“Good.” He smiled again. “I am going to assign you to the V’al quarter. The residents there are predominantly Romulans such as yourself and, like you, many have come from Federation-allied systems. Who knows? You may even bump into someone you know.”

“I doubt that, sir. I haven’t met many other Romulans until today.”

He shrugged, then handed her the papers. “Rent is due the fifth of every month. You can subsidize your rent through completed tasks, small jobs and the like. Just make sure the team leader you’re assigned to for the day signs off on your roster so you are appropriately credited. There’s no shortage of work so it is entirely possible to accumulate enough credit to completely cover your rent if you’re willing to work hard enough. That, if course, is entirely up to you.”

“Yes, sir.” She took the papers from him and gave a short bow.

“There’s no need for ceremony here.” He said. “Bowing isn’t necessary. Now, if you follow this road here towards the warehouse, then continue up that path for some distance you’ll come to the V’al. May the elements protect you, Young Starling.”

Aiel took her leave and followed his directions, glancing over as T’liss returned from the lake sans the Human. His green, scaly chest was wet with what she hoped was mere water.
Captain
Join Date: May 2013
Posts: 714
# 17
06-04-2014, 04:28 AM
OCC: Hello everyone. I figured i jump in considering my love for writing. I will be using my Federation Character for this RP.


The bulky lines of a federation battlecrusier dropped from transwarp. Her form hidden from sensors by her cloak. Few starfleet vessels were even allowed to operate a cloak but Captain William Deveros was one used to the shadows and he understood the tactical advantages of being unseen. His mission wasnt one of battle this day however. This was a mission of recruitment. William, "Will" to his friends, commanded the U.S.S. Sun Tzu. She was a new Avenger class warship...and thanks to the iconians, she no longer had a war to fight, not yet anyway. If what Will had seen about the iconians were true, there would be plenty of fighting. Which is why Will had taken the mission he had taken but it was completely unofficial. Starfleet had given Will special dispensation for his service and allowed him to operation far from federation space. He worked as one of starfleet's "Eyes" He explored but it wasnt new life he was seeking, but threats to Starfleet safety. HE worked in the darkness to ensure the existence of Starfleet and he did so, by the book. It was his personal mission to prove that the methods of Section 31 were not needed, that one could be covert and moral. Most importantly remaining covert could be done while following to book...mostly.

Will sat on the bridge of his ship, staring out the forward port. He hated this brigde. there was no large screen before him. Instead there was a large port which he could see through. The port was flanked by two screens but they were small and to Will, they seemed too far away. He would kill for the Bridge on one of the Odyssey class ships. Loved his ship, hated his bridge... Couldnt win them all. Before Will, the stars transformed from lines to points of light as the Sun Tzu dropped from transwarp.

"Sir, we have arrived at New Romulus." the helmsman reported.

"Good," Will paused, "Now lets see why i troubled yet brilliant cadet would abandon her home and career. I am beaming down. Keep the ship cloaked. I would rather our presence not be known. the romulans may not be our enemies but staying hidden from them will be good practice. If you can hide from a romulan, you can hide from anyone."

"Sir," Will's first officer started, " I know captains have been taking liberties as of late but i still dont like you-"

"Beaming down alone, i know." Will finished, "But I dont want a detail announcing the feds are here. i will allow you to beam down three operatives to shadow me. They, like me, must not be in uniform. If our target is here form the reasons reported then it wont be a problem, if she is here for different reasons... Lets just say i would like to play our cards close to the chest." Will stood and headed for the turbolift, "Oh, maintain transporter lock and keep the engine running. if we have to leave in a hurry, i want to be able to."

Will disappeared behind the doors of the turbolift on his way to his quarters to change. That cadet showed promise even though she was ballzy. Ballzy as hell in fact. Will though about one of her tests, one where she opted to eject and then destroy her own core to use it as a weapon....if she had only thought i but further along she would had survived and passed the test...if the lights are on, you still have power and its not how much power you have, but how you use the power you have. That bloody lieutenant, against his wishes, held her back even though he asked for her by name... How else was he to apologize for rigging the test in the first place? but the test wasnt the 'test' how she reacted to it was and that she passed with flying colors.

Some minutes later:

William followed the path to a small prefab building. He had been told these were the living quarters assigned to Aiel L’lwyn. He had knocked on the door but there was no answer. He decided to wait. Patients is a virtue.
Commander
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 362
# 18
06-04-2014, 05:07 AM
Standing on the bridge of the Competitor, Jacob Downy looked at his reflection in the view screen. His Beard had grown in during his Four months as a professor before he was abruptly pulled back into Starfleet. Now, he was in command of Starfleet's testbed of alien weapons and devices. In fact, the ship itself was even alien, a recovered Dominion Dreadnought.
"We have arrived at New Romulus, Captain.," his first officer, the alien Sheecoyoo said from the back of the bridge. They were here to pick up even more alien tech, this time two scorpion fighters that the Republic had agreed to provide to the Federation.
"Thank you for the update Commander," Jacob replied, "I will be in my ready room until we arrive over the beam down point, contact me there if you need me."

OoC: Will post more when I gat back home

Last edited by timothyre99; 06-04-2014 at 04:22 PM.
Captain
Join Date: Apr 2014
Posts: 11,190
# 19
06-04-2014, 12:09 PM
OOC: Yes! We have more people!

New Haven was a formerly abandoned Federation starbase in the middle of a nebula. Ithad plenty of weaponry to protect, and all of it was currently trained on the War Hawk. It was a custom between the crew of the base and the crew of the Hawk. It had started when Captain Hylian had been drunk when entering the Haven and fired off a few weapons.

"Identification, and a promise not to try to kill any of us this time." says New Haven's portmaster.

"The is the War Hawk, and I am her Captain. We promise not to fire off any weapons this time." Stelam replies.

The portmaster was confused. "Hylian, you sound different. Did something happen?" he asks.

"John, this is Stelam. Hylian is..." Stelam trails off.

"It's okay, buddy. Dock the ship and come tell me what happened." The transmission ends and the dock doors open.

"Delea."

Delea nods and docks the ship.

"Gerrard, tell everyone I want them back on this ship at 1600. Got it?" ordered Stelam.

"Yes sir." replied Gerrard. He was a vulcan, and didn't ever argue an order. Unless it was unlogical.

Stelam nods and leaves the ship. He takes a winding path around the ship to the dock and walks onto the starbase. He then takes a slow, but straight path to John's office. He takes a breath and opens the door. John stands, tears in his eyes, and rushes over to Stelam. He engulfs him in a hug, lifting him from the floor. John was twice his height, weight, and strength. He was also pretty emotional when it came to the death of a friend, especially when it was a close friend. And he knew that Hylian was like a father to Stelam, so that's what warranted this reaction.

"Oh my God. I'm so sorry for your loss, Stelam. He was a great man an-" he stops as he is overtaken by sobs.

"John. John. John, you're crushing me. Please let go." Stelam gasps.

"Oh. Oh, I'm sorry. You know how I get." he let's Stelam down and takes a breath. He then sits behind his desk. "Okay. Why don't you tell me how it happened."

"Okay." Stelam says and sits. He then relates the whole story to John. When he was done, he looks at John.

"You know John. I think I need break from privateering. Do you think the crew would do well enough without me for a few weeks, with Gerrard as Captain?" Stelam asks.

"It'd only be a temporary thing?" John asks.

"Yeah. Iwas thinking about helping on mol'Rihan. I mean New Romulus." Stelam says.

"Hmm. I think that would be possible. I'll talk to Gerrard if you want." John offers.

"No, no. I'll inform the crew, after selling my stuff for some credit. Though I'm taking a shuttle to mol'Rihan. The War Hawk is too well known." Stelam says.

"Of course." John replies solemly.

Stelam nods at John and leaves the office after goodbyes and walks to the ship. He boards, grabs his loot and sells it to the vendors he trusts. He returns to the ship at 1600 and gets on the comm. He had already gotten the bridge crews acceptance. Now it was time to inform the rest of the crew.

" This is your Captain speaking. Or rather, your Captain for now. I have decided to take some shore leave for a few months, or weeks depending on how I like it. I will be at mol'Rihan, to help with the construction. It'll help keep me humble. I hope you all have a great pillaging season while I'm gone, and Gerrard will be your Captain. I hope you won't try to kill him while I'm gone. Anyway, Captain out." he terminates the transmission, then looks at Gerrard. " I'll have a communicator with me in case I need early extraction. Okay?" Stelam raises an eyebrow.

"That is a logical decision sir. I hope you will have a relaxing time." Gerrard replies.

"More like a taxing time. Elements, why did I decide to do this. I could have gone to Risa..." Stelam mutters as he walks off the bridge.

He goes to his quarters, changes into refugee clothes and grabs a few knives. He leaves the ship and goes to the shuttle dock. He flashes his ticket to mol'Rihan and gets on. He sits in his spot, ready for the journey.

"mol'Rihan, here I come." he mutters as the ship takes off.
Commander
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 362
# 20
06-04-2014, 04:46 PM
In his ready room, Captain Jacob Downy reviewed the real reason he was here, Nathan Connors, a former Starfleet captain who defected along with the crew of his ship, the U.S.S. Leviathan, a Odyssey class battleship. These men now raid outer worlds of the Federation, and used their former Starfleet credentials, or forgeries, to gain access to Mol'Rihan and operate out of that system, the system Downy was currently in.

Starfleet Intelligence was monitoring his base waiting for a time to strike, but a complication had come up, Connors and his crew had managed to acquire classified information. This is why the Competitor had been dispatched, it had a perfect reason to be here, and Downy was secretly trained for espionage. Only he and the command staff of the Competitor knew the true reason for their presence, and they were all informed of their jobs.

He would send down his Chief Engineer and a crew of engineers and fighter pilots to retrieve and inspect the Scorpions. While this was happening, Downy and a team of 3 of his senior officers would beam down to retrieve and wipe out the information from the traitors' computers.

"Okay Sir, we are ready to beam down," He heard Sheecoyoo say through his combadge.

"I'll be to the transporter room in a few minutes, inform the fighter crew to report to transporter room 3, while the secondary team will be in transporter room 4," Downy replied, "Downy out." Jacob gathered up the supplies he would need from the table, a hacking kit and some combat supplies, in case things got messy, and he used his secret personal transporter to beam to transporter room 4 without being detected. Once there, he waited for his team to do the same, and they got on the pad, and beamed down.

OoC: Haha, cliffhanger, wait until tommorow. PS, I promise we can connect this to Aiel somehow on the surface, just not sure how yet.
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