Lt. Commander
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 120
# 21
02-25-2010, 01:19 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by gungin_garbonzo
wow ya thats really well put .. also a reason i liked enterprise because they didn't really have the prime directive but they started to realize that they should be considerate with other species.
I think one theme Star Trek has is that as a species advances both technologically (and therefore scientifically) and culturally. It evolves, including developing a more civilised 'civilisation' on the whole. I think whilst we are far from being saintly we have improved somewhat over the course of history and I would like to think that mankind will find greater enlightenment in the stars. Perhaps our intended future exploration of space will help to usher peace but let's not hold our breath. It's a shame the U.N doesn't hold a general assembly in space. If all the world's leaders could view the Earth from space and marvel at its beauty and complexity. Then they'd release the futility of conflict amongst themselves. Having said so, even Gene Roddenberry recognised that mankind needed to experience some sort of monumental upheaval before learning such a lesson. His interpretation was World War III.

On a final note. It's interesting to see why so many people enjoy playing MMORPGs, in particular Star Trek: Online. Yes there's the PvP element but I think most enjoy working together and being a small (but contributory) part of a greater whole. Humans have achieved much more when they work together than by dividing themselves into small groups. If you look back through history, yes man has inflicted pain and death on their fellow man but man has also worked together and co-operated to a large extent. It makes you think whether it's really a case of survival of the fittest or united?
Lt. Commander
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 120
# 22
03-01-2010, 02:04 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mach2Infinity View Post
It would be correct to state the Moon has been colonised rather than terraformed in the Star Trek universe. It would be a waste of resources to try and create a sustainable atmosphere on our Luna. I read on Memory Alpha that the Federation has begun to terraform Venus. Despite its proximity to the Sun it's only a few hundred kilometres less in diameter than the Earth. So its gravity is lighter than the Earth's but not so much that a little added 'spin' couldn't correct. On the other hand its pressure and heat is much higher than that of the Earth. Simply due to the advanced 'green house effect' on Venus. The Sun's rays penetrate the thick cloud layer but then the heat is trapped. In addition its atmosphere is at least made 90% of carbion dioxide. I believe mankind will eventually attempt to terraform the planet. We seem to challenge ourselves with near impossible goals but then life would be boring without such endeavour.

Addendum - Wikipedia terraforming article
Aerostat habitats and floating cities
Geoffrey A. Landis has summarized the perceived difficulties in colonizing Venus as being merely from the assumption that a colony would need to be based on the surface of a planet:

"However, viewed in a different way, the problem with Venus is merely that the ground level is too far below the one atmosphere level. At cloud-top level, Venus is the paradise planet."
He has proposed aerostat habitats followed by floating cities, based on the concept that breathable air (21:79 Oxygen-Nitrogen mixture) is a lifting gas in the dense Venusian atmosphere, with over 60% of the lifting power that helium has on Earth.[2] In effect, a balloon full of human-breathable air would sustain itself and extra weight (such as a colony) in midair. At an altitude of 50 km above Venusian surface, the environment is the most Earth-like in the solar system - a pressure of approximately 1 bar and temperatures in the 0C-50C range. Because there is not a significant pressure difference between the inside and the outside of the breathable-air balloon, any rips or tears would cause gases to diffuse at normal atmospheric mixing rates, giving time to repair any such damages. In addition, humans would not require pressurized suits when outside, merely air to breathe and a protection from the acidic rain. Alternatively, two-part domes could contain a lifting gas like hydrogen or helium (extractable from the atmosphere) to allow a higher mass density.


Cloud-top colonization also offers a way to avoid the issue of slow Venusian rotation. At the top of the clouds the wind speed on Venus reaches up to 95 m/s, circling the planet approximately every four Earth days in a phenomenon known as "super-rotation".[4] Colonies floating in this region could therefore have a much shorter day length by remaining untethered to the ground and moving with the atmosphere. While a space elevator extending to the surface of Venus is impractical due to the slow rotation, constructing a skyhook that extended into the upper atmosphere and rotated at the wind speed would not be difficult compared to constructing a space elevator on Earth.

Since such colonies would be viable in current Venusian conditions, this allows a dynamic approach to colonization instead of requiring extensive terraforming measures in advance. The main challenge would be using a substance resistant to sulfuric acid to serve as the structure's outer layer; ceramics or metal sulfates could possibly serve in this role. Dyneema, Polyethene and Polypropylene would be well usable for the skin of the balloon.

Landis has suggested that as more floating cities were built, they could form a solar shield around the planet, and could simultaneously be used to process the atmosphere into a more desirable form. If made from carbon nanotubes (recently fabricated into sheet form) or graphene (a sheet-like carbon allotrope), the major structural materials can be produced using carbon dioxide gathered in situ from the atmosphere. The recently synthesised amorphous carbonia might prove a useful structural material if it can be quenched to STP conditions, perhaps in a mixture with regular silica glass. According to Birch's analysis such colonies and materials would provide an immediate economic return from colonizing Venus, funding further terraforming efforts.

Landis' point about the ground level being too far below the one atmosphere level was also used by Larry Niven in his depiction of Plateau, a Venus-like planet with a small section of its surface rising up to the habitable level of the atmosphere. Similar setting is used in one of the early Poul Anderson novels.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Colonization_of_Venus
Lt. Commander
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 120
# 23
03-01-2010, 02:09 AM
50 Million people live on the moon according to Riker in "First Contact"

This was brought up before, unsure if the dev's plan to correct this. Would be good to have the complete solar system in the one area also. getting tired of absolutely everything being instance based. No real solar system one is able to explore.
Lt. Commander
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 120
# 24
03-01-2010, 02:35 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Enscar View Post
50 Million people live on the moon according to Riker in "First Contact"

This was brought up before, unsure if the dev's plan to correct this. Would be good to have the complete solar system in the one area also. getting tired of absolutely everything being instance based. No real solar system one is able to explore.
They have already stated they are planing to flesh out the universe including the solar system. The game is still currently bare minimum.
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