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Lt. Commander
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 120
# 11
04-21-2010, 11:57 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by sacerd View Post
Curious about this. Can you elaborate?
Yes please. After the dome was used by the Romans and Etruscans if I am not mistaken and then imported east. Although after the Fall of the Roman Empire large scale construction projects kinda fell out of favor so I guess I could see where you were coming from by knowledge of dome construction making it's way back west after things had settled down after the fall of the Roman and the rise of decently stable governments that made large scale construction projects possible again.
Lt. Commander
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 120
# 12
04-21-2010, 12:05 PM
History, I only took it because I hate geography and the teacher was hot. Of course when I didn't do any of the coursework over the years she called me out in front of the whole class at the end of school year just before the final exams guaranteeing me I couldn't do anything but fail. So I went a 100%'ed the test getting me a C.

When I next saw her I just said "History's easy" and walked away victorious.

Of course the jokes on me as a C in GSCE History is worthless in the real world. My time would have been better spent unconscious.
Lt. Commander
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 120
# 13
04-21-2010, 12:12 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ravenstein View Post
I am so there! You do not know how there I will be there. That is what I am all about!

Well that and death rays.
Tesla had a death ray....pity no country really invested heavily in it.
Lt. Commander
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 120
# 14
04-21-2010, 12:15 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by sacerd View Post
Curious about this. Can you elaborate?
Well, the dome was not indicative to any western-style church. The first that we see of this is in the Byzantine Empire under the emperor Justinian. He comissioned the Hagia Sophia, which placed a dome on a square base, and of course had to have some new architectural designs come with it. At this time, part of Italy was still under Byzantine control (with the Ostrogoths running it), and the town of Ravenna was the capital of this Ostrogothic kingdom. During Justinian's reign, he commissioned a church, Basilica San Vitale, to be built. This followed the Byzantine form, with the dome being supported by an octagonal wall under it (some may argue whether or not this is a true dome, but is considered a polygonal dome).
Pretty much from these two places, the architect of the dome spread. In the west, the next major project with a dome was Charlemagne's Chapel in Aachen (792-805). Others include St. Marks of Venice (1063-1094) and the Cathedral of St. Front Périgueux (1120-1173).
Why this is important is because of the dome being introduced into Western Europe, the rise of the Gothic style architecture with a half-dome for the Apse would probably never happened, and the architecture we consider Gothic would be different today. Good examples showing the half-dome for the Apse, usually always on the east side, are Westminster Abbey (constante construction on this building from its founding in 1080), Cathédrale Saint-Pierre d'Angoulême (1110 - 1128), and Basilique Saint-Denis (1137 - 1144, rebuilt from original with numerous modifications).
In Eastern Europe, and parts of Germany, the dome would take the "onion" shape that we often attribute to Russian Orthodox. However, most of this architecture would not appear until roughly the 1500s, and was heavily used during the Baroque period in Germany, Russia, and all lands inbetween.
Lt. Commander
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 120
# 15
04-21-2010, 12:15 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by ZonaSamurai
Tesla had a death ray....pity no country really invested heavily in it.
If you're referring to Wardenclyffe, that wasn't a death ray, it was an experiment in wireless power sources. A successful one, I might add. Probably would've revolutionized power management, except that 1) nobody wanted to buy any and 2) Tesla eventually dismantled it because he feared its weaponization potential.
Lt. Commander
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 120
# 16
04-21-2010, 12:18 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vrano
Well, the dome was not indicative to any western-style church. The first that we see of this is in the Byzantine Empire under the emperor Justinian. He comissioned the Hagia Sophia, which placed a dome on a square base, and of course had to have some new architectural designs come with it. At this time, part of Italy was still under Byzantine control (with the Ostrogoths running it), and the town of Ravenna was the capital of this Ostrogothic kingdom. During Justinian's reign, he commissioned a church, Basilica San Vitale, to be built. This followed the Byzantine form, with the dome being supported by an octagonal wall under it (some may argue whether or not this is a true dome, but is considered a polygonal dome).
Pretty much from these two places, the architect of the dome spread. In the west, the next major project with a dome was Charlemagne's Chapel in Aachen (792-805). Others include St. Marks of Venice (1063-1094) and the Cathedral of St. Front Périgueux (1120-1173).
Why this is important is because of the dome being introduced into Western Europe, the rise of the Gothic style architecture with a half-dome for the Apse would probably never happened, and the architecture we consider Gothic would be different today. Good examples showing the half-dome for the Apse, usually always on the east side, are Westminster Abbey (constante construction on this building from its founding in 1080), Cathédrale Saint-Pierre d'Angoulême (1110 - 1128), and Basilique Saint-Denis (1137 - 1144, rebuilt from original with numerous modifications).
In Eastern Europe, and parts of Germany, the dome would take the "onion" shape that we often attribute to Russian Orthodox. However, most of this architecture would not appear until roughly the 1500s, and was heavily used during the Baroque period in Germany, Russia, and all lands inbetween.
Ah. Thought was what you meant.

On a related note, I love playing the Byzantines in historical simulations.
Lt. Commander
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 120
# 17
04-21-2010, 12:22 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ravenstein View Post
Yes please. After the dome was used by the Romans and Etruscans if I am not mistaken and then imported east. Although after the Fall of the Roman Empire large scale construction projects kinda fell out of favor so I guess I could see where you were coming from by knowledge of dome construction making it's way back west after things had settled down after the fall of the Roman and the rise of decently stable governments that made large scale construction projects possible again.
You are certainly correct about this. In Rome, you had the Pantheon was built in 27 BC. So, dome architecture was prevalent, but if you look at the architecture of the whole building, like the Pantheon, the walls were curved to match the dome. When the Hagia Sophia was built, it presented a new type of architecture, a dome on a square. Now, load-bearing had to be rethought, and it was with the invention of the Pendentive, a load bearing pylon, that made this possible. Also, the Hagia Sophia has one full dome, and two half domes to help distribute the weight.

The dome architecture, from Byzantium, seemed to have spread out in all directions. You can follow it's path through the Middle East, down to Africa, to East and West Europe.
Lt. Commander
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 120
# 18
04-21-2010, 12:23 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vrano
You are certainly correct about this. In Rome, you had the Pantheon was built in 27 BC. So, dome architecture was prevalent, but if you look at the architecture of the whole building, like the Pantheon, the walls were curved to match the dome. When the Hagia Sophia was built, it presented a new type of architecture, a dome on a square. Now, load-bearing had to be rethought, and it was with the invention of the Pendentive, a load bearing pylon, that made this possible. Also, the Hagia Sophia has one full dome, and two half domes to help distribute the weight.

The dome architecture, from Byzantium, seemed to have spread out in all directions. You can follow it's path through the Middle East, down to Africa, to East and West Europe.
Fun. Thanks Vrano.
Lt. Commander
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 120
# 19
04-21-2010, 12:25 PM
Oooh Vrano, so close. You would have had an "A" on that wonderful essay (unlike your poetry paper) but you forgot to type and double space it as well as put in in Bodini font. So I can only give you a "D".
In our classes today, we took an entire Junior class to see teh play "1776". that was 18 buses of fun.
Lt. Commander
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 120
# 20
04-21-2010, 12:27 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by MycroftHolmes View Post
Oooh Vrano, so close. You would have had an "A" on that wonderful essay (unlike your poetry paper) but you forgot to type and double space it as well as put in in Bodini font. So I can only give you a "D".
In our classes today, we took an entire Junior class to see teh play "1776". that was 18 buses of fun.
doh :-P ....
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