Lt. Commander
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 120
Hi,

I'm trying to make a list of every tos episode that had a malevolent and evil supercomputer (or advanced machine that became evil).

What I have so far:

The Changling
The Ultimate Computer
The Return of the Archons
For the World is Hollow and I Have Touched the Sky
A Taste of Armageddon

I'd also appreciate any help from all of you in identifying later trek episodes with evil supercomputers that are running societies. Did Picard ever destroy a false god computer like Kirk? Other examples?
Lt. Commander
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 120
# 2
09-06-2010, 07:38 PM
The one with the two sides waging virtual war is "A Taste of Armageddon". http://memory-alpha.org/wiki/Star_Tr...riginal_Series is the episode guide for TOS on Memory Alpha.

I don't remember specific episodes off-hand, but I seem to recall reading that Kirk defeated an artificial intelligence via talking alone at least five times during TOS. As for later shows, I'm pretty tired so I having trouble remembering specific instances. I do recall there was a Voyager episode, Dreadnought, with a semi-sentient missile B'Elanna had programmed once.
Lt. Commander
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 120
# 3
09-06-2010, 07:41 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Allerka View Post
The one with the two sides waging virtual war is "A Taste of Armageddon". http://memory-alpha.org/wiki/Star_Tr...riginal_Series is the episode guide for TOS on Memory Alpha.

I don't remember specific episodes off-hand, but I seem to recall reading that Kirk defeated an artificial intelligence via talking alone at least five times during TOS. As for later shows, I'm pretty tired so I having trouble remembering specific instances. I do recall there was a Voyager episode, Dreadnought, with a semi-sentient missile B'Elanna had programmed once.

Thanks, yes Dreadnought is a great example. I can't remember how Torres stopped it. Did she make it commit suicide with a logic puzzle, lol?
Lt. Commander
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 120
# 4
09-06-2010, 07:49 PM
The one with 'The Oracle' (who controlled the Asteriod ship Yonada); is entitled "For the World is Hollow And I have Touched the Sky"

Also, depending on how you're defining things - the episode with 'Ruk','Andrea', and an android/transfer of the mind of Dr. 'Roger Corby' mightr fight - that's What Are Little Girls Made Of

Also, there's an episode where Harry Muud is held 'captive' by a race of Androids bent onb conquering the Galaxy by making all species dependent on them - entitled: "I Mudd'

Also, there's a primative people being cared for by a 'God machine' (called 'Vol') entitled: "The Apple"

and lastly:

There's an episode with Lee Meriwheather as 'Kolinnda' (a projection by a computer being used to defend an artificially created planet) - entitled: "That Which Survives"

Hope this helps.
Lt. Commander
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 120
# 5
09-07-2010, 04:38 AM
What do you guys and gals think of this thesis of sorts:

Overall, Star Trek's attitude toward advanced technology and science was ambivalent. On the one hand, TOS promoted advanced technologies as potentially liberating for mankind, standing in as "the measure of man," his progress, and his scientific enlightenment. In this positive depiction of science and technology, man always retained control over the machine, utilizing it as a tool and domesticating it as an ally for social advancement. On the other hand, Star Trek expressed deep hostility and anxiety toward out-of-control technologies, which became inherently dangerous and even downright evil due to their ability to master their makers. When advanced computers took over the control of space exploration or the social institutions, the result was never good.

This ambivalence towards advanced technology and supercomputers reflected a growing cultural ambivalence during the 1960s.
Lt. Commander
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 120
# 6
09-07-2010, 04:54 AM
Yeah, i think that about nails it down, part of the issue in the 60's though was the specter of Nuclear war, the essence of technology becoming more of a threat than a benefit.

I think it was more fear of the unknown than ambivalence.
Lt. Commander
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 120
# 7
09-07-2010, 04:55 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kirkfat View Post
What do you guys and gals think of this thesis of sorts:

Overall, Star Trek's attitude toward advanced technology and science was ambivalent. On the one hand, TOS promoted advanced technologies as potentially liberating for mankind, standing in as "the measure of man," his progress, and his scientific enlightenment. In this positive depiction of science and technology, man always retained control over the machine, utilizing it as a tool and domesticating it as an ally for social advancement. On the other hand, Star Trek expressed deep hostility and anxiety toward out-of-control technologies, which became inherently dangerous and even downright evil due to their ability to master their makers. When advanced computers took over the control of space exploration or the social institutions, the result was never good.

This ambivalence towards advanced technology and supercomputers reflected a growing cultural ambivalence during the 1960s.
Sound great.

I preferred my thesis: that Star Trek represented the post-modern or existential attitudes of the 1960s and 1970s. That it dreamt of a post-nationalist future in the Federation: one that put aside the then-present concerns with national identity being equated with rightness. The V'Ger scene, instead of hackneyed, is actual a metaphor that the greatest threat to us is ourselves and not understanding others' perspective. A somewhat naive sentiment but still fairly good as a general policy.

That and the Motion Picture was fairly naughty on a symbolic level. It's one of the raciest Star Trek films, oddly enough.
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