Lt. Commander
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 120
# 11
01-20-2011, 07:05 PM
And for some reason while reading this, while trying to figure out the specifics of why I was reading it, I pictured an airplane making the Voyager nacelle folding up clicking and clanking before aiming down the right runway with the warp charging up noise, culminating with it whipping by with a thunderous bang and flash.

And suddenly I realize I no longer wish to patronize the airline industry.
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# 12
01-20-2011, 07:06 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by spartan844
http://www.digitaltrends.com/wp-cont...eamliner-2.jpg

What the heck is this thing supposed to be, a bird?

Well...have you ever wondered how birds can glide for hours on end with little to no effort? :p
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# 13
01-20-2011, 07:15 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by President_Shinzon View Post
And for some reason while reading this, while trying to figure out the specifics of why I was reading it, I pictured an airplane making the Voyager nacelle folding up clicking and clanking before aiming down the right runway with the warp charging up noise, culminating with it whipping by with a thunderous bang and flash.

And suddenly I realize I no longer wish to patronize the airline industry.
That might make for a very interesting plane some day. Or not...
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# 14
01-20-2011, 07:16 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cuatela
Well...have you ever wondered how birds can glide for hours on end with little to no effort? :p
I thought they just got malleted into a shallow orbit.
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# 15
01-21-2011, 12:01 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by hort_wort View Post
I thought they just got malleted into a shallow orbit.
YES! YES! I mean yes... Thats how it happens. *nods madly*
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# 16
01-21-2011, 02:42 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cuatela
Well...have you ever wondered how birds can glide for hours on end with little to no effort? :p
Miniature Jet Packs. I'm sorry to spoil the myth. It's not wing shape nor patches of hot air providing lift.
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# 17
01-21-2011, 07:11 AM
i dont find this thread as amusing as the others and will not be playing in it.
Lt. Commander
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# 18
01-21-2011, 07:23 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by hort_wort View Post
How does it fly upside-down? :p
Probably the same mechanics; I'm not a physics major, so I can't be certain.

Although flying an aircraft upside-down is, at least according to the guides at the Udvar-Hazy Annex of the National Air and Space Museum, is how Boeing sold the first 707s. (The pilot was actually performing a barrel roll against orders. When the pubilicist saw it, he, rather embarrassed, turned around to the airline execs to apologize, only to see them filling out orders.)

Quote:
Originally Posted by President_Shinzon View Post
And for some reason while reading this, while trying to figure out the specifics of why I was reading it, I pictured an airplane making the Voyager nacelle folding up clicking and clanking before aiming down the right runway with the warp charging up noise, culminating with it whipping by with a thunderous bang and flash.
The Navy actually has aircraft that do that, more likely to make space for a full complement of carrier-based aircraft (don't know if the F-35C has that feature - probably does).

Personally, I never figured out why the Intrepid-class has that feature, other than Rule of Cool. The Klingon Bird of Prey does this at least to differentiate between cruising speed (wings level), attack (wings down) and landing (wings raised high, seen only in ST III and IV). On the Intrepid, it just seems unneccessary.
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# 19
01-21-2011, 07:31 AM
I thought the 787's winglet thingies were to reduce those spirals that come off the ends of the wing?
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# 20
01-21-2011, 07:36 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Archanubis
Personally, I never figured out why the Intrepid-class has that feature, other than Rule of Cool. The Klingon Bird of Prey does this at least to differentiate between cruising speed (wings level), attack (wings down) and landing (wings raised high, seen only in ST III and IV). On the Intrepid, it just seems unneccessary.
Here are some theories on Voyager's tilting warp nacelles (of course, the real reason is to make the ship look cooler...But these are quite convincing):

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bernd_Schneider
The warp nacelles Voyager is the first ship to have foldable nacelles and pylons, at least the first ship we know of. "Because Voyager employs a new folding wing-and-nacelle configuration, warp fields may no longer have a negative impact on habitable worlds, as established in TNG." This sentence from the Star Trek Voyager Technical Guide V1.0 is actually the only hint that the folding pylons may prevent the subspace damage of TNG: "Force of Nature". It was never mentioned on screen.

Another theory is that the efficiency of the warp field can be increased if it is continually tilted as the speed rises, in a similar fashion as on the F-111 and other aircraft with variable wing positions. However, the existing shots of Voyager in space don't make any sense, since only two angles of the nacelle pylons can be observed: 0 (horizontal) for impulse flight, and about 35 as soon as the ship goes to warp, remaining constant irrespective of the speed. While it makes sense for an aircraft to have just two wing positions for slow and for fast hypersonic flight, Voyager's warp drive is offline at impulse anyway, hence not requiring any specific nacelle position. It is not evident why the nacelles are folded up at all every time the ship goes to warp, and why they are not just fixed in the warp position.
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