Lt. Commander
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 120
# 11
04-20-2011, 06:01 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Walshicus
Seems a bit naff to me. Putting Aspirin, Tea and Coffee in the same category as Heroin?
In real life it's very silly to weigh all those equally. However in the land of "legalese" and compliance with legal rules common sense seems to get lost somewhere.

The best thing to do is just stick with fictional names for any medicines, that way there's nothing to worry about.
Lt. Commander
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 120
# 12
04-20-2011, 07:07 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trueheart
In real life it's very silly to weigh all those equally. However in the land of "legalese" and compliance with legal rules common sense seems to get lost somewhere.

The best thing to do is just stick with fictional names for any medicines, that way there's nothing to worry about.
It also makes it feel pretty sci-fi.

Yeah, you can get really absurd going in that direction. Like when somebody in a sci-fi show says, "Even a broken chronometer is right twice a day."

I mean... Chronometer? Really? It's easier to use a four syllable Greek word than "clock"?

It can be pretty campy.

But this is Star Trek. I think it's probably better to embrace the camp aspects. Every one of the five series (and the films) were generally at their best when they embraced the camp aspects of the genre. Even other sci-fi shows that were lighter on camp found a memorable place for it, such as BSG and the "last tube of toothpaste" (treating something common as something exotic) or Firefly and Jaynestown (treating the idea of a theme world from a space show as something character centric).

There's a TON of reference available for Trek. (You can find the names of every named casualty in the Dominion War.) So there's generally always a fictional Trek substance to fill the need of the story and you can always make one up. And consider this: if you do use a real substance, you'll lose somebody.

Emphasize caffeine or alcohol and you'll lose the Mormons or some Baptists. Emphasize a harder drug and, chances are, somebody in your audience (it's a big audience) may know someone who died from it.

Make up a chemical or a virus and everyone can come into the story with more of a blank slate, ready to accept your story.
Lt. Commander
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 120
# 13
04-20-2011, 08:32 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Leviathan99
Emphasize caffeine or alcohol and you'll lose the Mormons or some Baptists.
This is again, absolutely absurd and I really doubt in the ToU [or its spirit]. Captain Picard's favourite drink? Earl Grey. Earl Grey contains caffeine. Janeway's? Coffee. Coffee contains caffeine.

The insinuation that Earl Grey, Hot is out of bounds for a Star Trek game is baffling.

EDIT: I don't want you to think I'm having a go at you - just the notion!
Lt. Commander
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 120
# 14
04-20-2011, 08:45 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Walshicus
This is again, absolutely absurd and I really doubt in the ToU [or its spirit]. Captain Picard's favourite drink? Earl Grey. Earl Grey contains caffeine. Janeway's? Coffee. Coffee contains caffeine.

The insinuation that Earl Grey, Hot is out of bounds for a Star Trek game is baffling.

EDIT: I don't want you to think I'm having a go at you - just the notion!
Oh. That last bit is not so much a rationale for the EULA. Just pointing out that certain details can shrink your audience and using a simple sci-fi substitute may allow you to hit people who would stop listening if you used the real world equivalent.

That's the very reason Twilight Zone was created, in large measure. Because Rod Serling was censored when he tried to address hate groups and racially motivated crime in a more realistic way on TV. And that informed the creation of Star Trek.

People won't listen if you use a real world substance or situation a lot of the time. Same with most drugs or wars or political parties or religions. But when you make something new up, you bypass preconceptions. You bypass the "This offends me" or "This is directed too much at me" or "I don't have this problem; other people do" instinct that can block an audience from enjoying your story.

So while that may not be the reason behind the EULA... and you may think the EULA is silly... complying with it can have side benefits.

Same with the Comics Code Authority. The rules behind that were basically a racket to stop congressional hearings and shut down horror and crime comic publishers, to some measure, with rules tailor drafted by their competitors to shut them out of carrying the seal. But at the same time, some of the strangest and most creative work in American comics came out of living with the limitations of the code.
Lt. Commander
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 120
# 15
04-20-2011, 08:52 AM
Here's my response: with all the technobabble reasons given to us in canon for someone to act strange, why do you have to resort to using drugs? And most players are not going to care what "drug" is in the hypospray; just say "Inject with Hypospray."

Quote:
Originally Posted by Leviathan99
Emphasize caffeine or alcohol and you'll lose the Mormons or some Baptists. Emphasize a harder drug and, chances are, somebody in your audience (it's a big audience) may know someone who died from it.
Let's keep our personal stereotypes out of this discussion.
Lt. Commander
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 120
# 16
04-20-2011, 08:52 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Walshicus
This is again, absolutely absurd and I really doubt in the ToU [or its spirit]. Captain Picard's favourite drink? Earl Grey. Earl Grey contains caffeine. Janeway's? Coffee. Coffee contains caffeine.

The insinuation that Earl Grey, Hot is out of bounds for a Star Trek game is baffling.

EDIT: I don't want you to think I'm having a go at you - just the notion!
And tea can be decaff. So the presence of the drug is not implied or guaranteed.

I would think you could have people drinking without implying alcohol or caffeine. The drug is the issue, mostly, not the medium its contained in. (Although I bet you'd take more flak in drug exclusive mediums like smoking or injections.)

I think the real issue here is that the rating for this game doesn't mention drugs or alcohol (like, say, WoW's does, at least alcohol), similar to how STO indicates "Mild Suggestive Themes" instead of "Suggestive Themes".

This raises an interesting point: The ESRB doesn't consider the magic addiction or potions in WoW to be drug use. Assuming this restriction has the ESRB in mind, fantasy substances are probably not drugs as far as this concerned.
Lt. Commander
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 120
# 17
04-20-2011, 11:05 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Leviathan99
I think the real issue here is that the rating for this game doesn't mention drugs or alcohol (like, say, WoW's does, at least alcohol), similar to how STO indicates "Mild Suggestive Themes" instead of "Suggestive Themes".

This raises an interesting point: The ESRB doesn't consider the magic addiction or potions in WoW to be drug use. Assuming this restriction has the ESRB in mind, fantasy substances are probably not drugs as far as this concerned.
But doesn't the game significantly reference drugs, or at least alcohol? A good number of the food items in the game are alcohols of some sort, and a good part of "night of the comet" mission has you trying to mix drinks, and not everything referenced was fictional. Which is why I'd like a clarification, if possible.
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