Lt. Commander
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 120
# 11
01-13-2012, 04:53 PM
Perfonnally, I's ftill uzing 1650s fpelingf and conbenfionf. Then waf non juftificating of the fschangef put fourth in modernity.

Fun fact: Because Johnson's English Dictionary didn't use the same spelling conventions as the Oxford (if it did, you'd still spell shoes schoose), many American spellings were standardized roughly 80 years before their English counterparts.
Lt. Commander
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 120
# 12
01-13-2012, 04:56 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by hevach View Post
Perfonnally, I's ftill uzing 1650s fpelingf and conbenfionf. Then waf non juftificating of the fschangef put fourth in modernity.

Fun fact: Because Johnson's English Dictionary didn't use the same spelling conventions as the Oxford (if it did, you'd still spell shoes schoose), many American spellings were standardized roughly 80 years before their English counterparts.
Okay, someone please translate the first paragraph. My universal translator is broken, lol... All I got was, "Personally, I'm still using 1650's spelling and [...]. Then [...] [...] (justifying?) of the change put forth in (modernity?)

Cool fun fact, btw.
Lt. Commander
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# 13
01-13-2012, 04:58 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by rswfire View Post
I don't know how I missed that. I swear, I looked, lol... Maybe it's a Kentucky thing, then. Someone here said "papi" to me when talking about some family issues, and I was like, "what?" They told me it means "grandfather." I get a kick out of some of the things I hear that require explaining! (And you didn't offend me with your "goofy" comment; I took it light-heartedly.)
'Meemaw' and 'peepaw' are also apparently considered appropriate substitutions for 'grandma' and 'grandpa' in this area. I have no clue what the etymology behind those particular terms might be.
Lt. Commander
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 120
# 14
01-13-2012, 04:59 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by rswfire View Post
Okay, someone please translate the first paragraph. My universal translator is broken, lol... All I got was, "Personally, I'm still using 1650's spelling and [...]. Then [...] [...] (justifying?) of the change put forth in (modernity?)

Cool fun fact, btw.


Personally, I'm still using 1650's spelling and conventions. There was no justification for the changes put forth in the modern era.
Lt. Commander
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 120
# 15
01-13-2012, 05:00 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by hevach View Post
Perfonnally, I's ftill uzing 1650s fpelingf and conbenfionf. Then waf non juftificating of the fschangef put fourth in modernity.

Fun fact: Because Johnson's English Dictionary didn't use the same spelling conventions as the Oxford (if it did, you'd still spell shoes schoose), many American spellings were standardized roughly 80 years before their English counterparts.
The long lower-case "s" did look like a lower-case "f" without the crossbar and with a descender. It was still sounded as "ss", but it was only used in the initial and medial positions. The short lower-case "s" we're used to is what they used in the final position. So you should have said"fpelins and conbenfions", for example.

There was a cursive long "s", too. It looked like a cursive lower-case "f", but the bottom loop looped back toward the start of the line. It looked sort of like a figure eight. Sort of.

* * * * *

Seriously, though, the game is based in the US, so it's only reasonable to expect US spelling. If I was playing a UK based game, I'd expect UK spelling.
Lt. Commander
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 120
# 16
01-13-2012, 05:07 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by hevach View Post
Personally, I'm still using 1650's spelling and conventions. There was no justification for the changes put forth in the modern era.
Awe, you ruined it. You didn't give someone else a chance to try and translate it.
Lt. Commander
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Posts: 120
# 17
01-13-2012, 05:12 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by BenjaminMaxwell View Post
I'm from Virginia, get into West Virginia quite often, and can assure you, 'ma' and 'pa' are still very much a part of the active vernacular in both states.

The area is also rife with Jerry Springer-style dialects, but those don't translate into writing quite as easily. Just imagine 'daddy' pronounced with an 'h' thrown into it randomly.
Jerry Springer style dialects have so many subtle nuances of kicks, punches, eye gouges, scratching and hair pulling that the written form can be quite confusing.
Lt. Commander
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 120
# 18
01-13-2012, 05:29 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Synther View Post
Jerry Springer style dialects have so many subtle nuances of kicks, punches, eye gouges, scratching and hair pulling that the written form can be quite confusing.
Indeed. It is equally as difficult to articulate chair-throwing and shirt-ripping.
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# 19
01-13-2012, 05:33 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by BenjaminMaxwell View Post
Indeed. It is equally as difficult to articulate chair-throwing and shirt-ripping.
This chair-throwing and shirt-ripping could be from the Kirk days. I am starting to think that he had one extra green coloured ripped shirt in his wardrobe.
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# 20
01-13-2012, 07:01 PM
Realize, bluecat, that Star Trek was an American made TV series and series of films and uses American spellings and just deal with it. This isn't Dr. Who Online is it? Okay then.

Seriously, man, there are much bigger things to worry about right now.


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