Lt. Commander
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# 1 Ray Bradbury
06-06-2012, 08:07 AM
Ray Bradbury 1920-2012

" There Will Come Soft Rains", 1950

"I Sing the Body Electric!", 1969

"A Sound of Thunder", 1952

"Fahrenheit 451" 1953

To name a few fav's of mine.

Thank you Mr. Bradbury for your legacy of fine writing.
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# 2
06-06-2012, 08:52 AM
:::sadface:::
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# 3
06-06-2012, 08:59 AM
indeed Mars is so much colder now.
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# 4
06-06-2012, 09:25 AM
For most of one's life, people fear death. When people get to a certain age, they start to welcome death. At 91 years old, I assume that most people would welcome death and wish for the end of this journey and the start of the next one.
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# 5
06-06-2012, 10:32 AM
Fahrenheit 451 was the most important book I ever read. It still informs my entire world view. God Bless you Ray. We won't forget what you've taught us.
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# 6
06-06-2012, 10:38 AM
R.I.P. Ray Bradbury
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# 7
06-06-2012, 10:47 AM
His imagery and prose still fuel my dreams....

As a prolific reader since first grade, his works became some of my favorites to enjoy over and over.

Sorely missed, but never forgotten...

So long Mr. Bradbury..., may this be your first step to living in your worlds of fantasy and stars...
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# 8
06-06-2012, 12:09 PM
Farewell to one of the Masters. Who not only wrote some of the best works of science-fiction. But who was also an early adopter of Star Trek. He was amongst such contemporaries as Isaac Asimov, who understood the storytelling potential that Star Trek offered the television viewing public.

Edited to add this piece about mistaken identity.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ray Bradbury
Gene Roddenberry asked me to be part of the "Star Trek" family as a writer 25 years ago. He showed me the pilot, and I looked at it and liked it but said at that time that I've never been able to adapt other people's characters--no matter how much I admire them. So, one of the sad things of my life is I was never able to participate in the love and joy that made "Star Trek" so special.

But, ironically, for many years people have thought I was Gene Roddenberry. It never bothered me because I loved him as a friend and admired him as a creator. I was always very proud every time a bunch of young people ran up to me and said, "Oh, Mr. Roddenberry, we all love you and we love 'Star Trek'." It happened all the time. I learned over the years to simply say, "Oh, I'm so glad that you like the show. I wrote it for you and I created it for you." And I let them run off thinking I was Mr. Roddenberry. . . .
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# 9
06-06-2012, 03:28 PM
Ray Bradbury was introduced to me (as an author) by an elementary-school English teacher. His books were the "gateway drug" that led me to Asimov, Heinlein, Clarke, Niven, Pohl, Pournelle, Card, and of course everyone's favorite crank, Harlan Ellison.

We are fortunate that he was so prolific, because it means we all have so much of his work available to us.

Also, as a resident of Northern IL, I've made a point in the past of stopping by a few spots in Waukegan that show up in his stories. Kind of cool to see it and see how it matches his prose.

Farewell, Ray. Thanks for everything.
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# 10
06-06-2012, 04:08 PM
451 was the book that changed my life... Before, all I really did was sports and this game... Now, when I'm not at practice, I'm reading something. Anything.
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