Starfleet Veteran
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 65
# 1 Solid State HD's + STO
08-30-2013, 07:31 AM
I've bought a SSD and wanna know if i can just drag my STO folder from my HDD straight onto the SSD without any load-up problems afterwards?

Anybody with experience on this problem?

Experience not opinion.....
Commander
Join Date: Sep 2012
Posts: 486
# 2
08-30-2013, 07:38 AM
STO doesnt seem to rely on sophisticated registry path crap etc, so yes it should work without a problem.
Career Officer
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 2,071
# 3
08-30-2013, 07:47 AM
You probably should run the install program at least once for the new file system location, just to get the registries and directory permissions correct, then instead of doing the download, you could just drag and copy the old directory to the new one...
Lieutenant
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 81
# 4
08-31-2013, 07:08 AM
SSDs are finicky if you don't know what you're doing with them. There's the TRIM function, and without it you're setting yourself up for a major failure possibly.

Try to make as few WRITE commands to your SSD as possible. I wouldn't recommend putting STO on your SSD it will make little difference from your mechanical drive in terms of speed unless your mechanical is a real pos and slow.

If you ever reformat that SSD make sure you do a full sector wipe..

I recommend putting your windows temp folders / download folders / etc on a diff drive.. and changing your internet browsers' cache to it too..
Captain
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 1,887
# 5
08-31-2013, 09:35 AM
SSDs have a very fast read rate which make them great for static files such as the OS but their write rate is on par or not as good as a mechanical drive, which means it's best to put any paging, temp and swap files on a different drive.
STO makes heavy use of a caching system to expand run and patch it's compressed hogg files on the fly, that makes for a lot of read and write operations to the drive, and since the game has no setting for allowing caching to a separate drive you may actually notice decreased performance running it from an SSD. You can disable on-demand patching for the game but you need to have a lot of ram available to do so safely.
Lastly like any flash memory an SSD has a top end limit to the number of write operations it can do before the device becomes unusable so its always a good idea to keep write heavy operations off of that drive.
If something is not broken, don't fix it, if it is broken, don't leave it.
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Career Officer
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 2,071
# 6
08-31-2013, 10:17 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by sitheach View Post
SSDs are finicky if you don't know what you're doing with them. There's the TRIM function, and without it you're setting yourself up for a major failure possibly.

Try to make as few WRITE commands to your SSD as possible. I wouldn't recommend putting STO on your SSD it will make little difference from your mechanical drive in terms of speed unless your mechanical is a real pos and slow.

If you ever reformat that SSD make sure you do a full sector wipe..
...
Now it is true that the Flash RAM in a SSD can only have a finite number of writes before it fails and becomes unusable. However, modern SSD drives are designed so that their MTBF are at least as good as conventional Hard Disk drives, so running STO shouldn't be an issue...

However, it is because of this issue that for a reformat, a full sector wipe is not recommended... And don't bother with defragmentation of a SSD drive volume, as seek time and latency are not applicable to a SSD drive, and the only thing the operation will accomplish is to use up some of the limited lifespam of the SSD flash ram.
Captain
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 669
# 7
08-31-2013, 10:26 AM
I run STO on an SSD and have absolutly no issues.
Lieutenant
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 81
# 8
08-31-2013, 10:47 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by grouchyotaku View Post
Now it is true that the Flash RAM in a SSD can only have a finite number of writes before it fails and becomes unusable. However, modern SSD drives are designed so that their MTBF are at least as good as conventional Hard Disk drives, so running STO shouldn't be an issue...

However, it is because of this issue that for a reformat, a full sector wipe is not recommended... And don't bother with defragmentation of a SSD drive volume, as seek time and latency are not applicable to a SSD drive, and the only thing the operation will accomplish is to use up some of the limited lifespam of the SSD flash ram.
If you don't do a secure-erase then your SSDs performance will be crap. When it comes time to put new data on the drive the old data will still be there and will severely degrade the performance of the drive while it tries to write over the old data.
Career Officer
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 2,071
# 9
08-31-2013, 12:41 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by sitheach View Post
If you don't do a secure-erase then your SSDs performance will be crap. When it comes time to put new data on the drive the old data will still be there and will severely degrade the performance of the drive while it tries to write over the old data.
This may have been a issue with the first generation of SSD units, but not the new ones. New drives can over-write data as quickly as a write to blank data. (Most of the speed increase is from 'caching' the write data using onboard SSD ram to buffer writes... As long as your writes can fit within the cache buffer, which is usually a couple of megabytes in size...) There was also the issue that writing the same data to a SSD could wear out some memory cells quicker then the others, but modern SSD units get around this issue by actually running the data through a crypto hardware chip first to 'randomize' the data...

The only real reason to do a 'secure' erase on a SSD drive is if you want to eliminate data that you don't want anyone else to find... (e.g. 'secret' documents, kiddy porn, etc...) though data confidentiality is a all together different issue... And many modern SSD drives, when given the 'secure' erase command, will look like their going through the procedure, but in the background, are only doing a 'quick' reformat...

Last edited by grouchyotaku; 08-31-2013 at 12:45 PM.
Lieutenant
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 81
# 10
08-31-2013, 03:39 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by grouchyotaku View Post
This may have been a issue with the first generation of SSD units, but not the new ones. New drives can over-write data as quickly as a write to blank data. (Most of the speed increase is from 'caching' the write data using onboard SSD ram to buffer writes... As long as your writes can fit within the cache buffer, which is usually a couple of megabytes in size...) There was also the issue that writing the same data to a SSD could wear out some memory cells quicker then the others, but modern SSD units get around this issue by actually running the data through a crypto hardware chip first to 'randomize' the data...

The only real reason to do a 'secure' erase on a SSD drive is if you want to eliminate data that you don't want anyone else to find... (e.g. 'secret' documents, kiddy porn, etc...) though data confidentiality is a all together different issue... And many modern SSD drives, when given the 'secure' erase command, will look like their going through the procedure, but in the background, are only doing a 'quick' reformat...
It's per-manufacturer how when and why. If you have a kingston drive, a modern one - they advise you SECURE ERASE before reinstalling anything. Unless the drive is clean to begin with. So does Intel. So does Corsair. So does ADATA.. etc, etc.

There's specific ways for specific drives. Win7+ Trim doesn't properly work on every drive. Hence manual SE. I suggest you read a little more about it.
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