Lt. Commander
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 106
# 31
03-17-2013, 03:52 PM
Personal Log: "Blast from the Past"
Stardate 90811.23

We've just returned from the Imaga System and our battle against the Planet Killer. It's been some time since I've had a chance to make a log entry, so this one may be a little rambling.

It all began with a report from Admiral Quinn on the rogue Klingon raids on medical ships, apparently another one of Ambassador B'vat's schemes. Our investigation uncovered a series of grim medical experiments intended to splice both Klingon and Gorn DNA with that of the 20th century Augments, creating hybrid monsters that seemed more like rabid animals than sentient beings. That anyone could call that an improvement is... well, it's madness.

Apparently this isn't the first time it's happened either: Chirurgeon P'Trell mentioned a similar experiment hundreds of years ago that turned into a plague and created a whole generation of Klingons that could almost be called half-human. We never covered that in Klingon history at the academy; I guess it's something they don't like to talk about, though it does explain some of the pictures from the first Klingon War. Does every planet have to repeat the same mistake for itself just to learn the same lesson? Can't they see how badly it went for Earth and just leave well enough alone?

But it's hard blame the Klingons too much since a human orchestrated the whole thing: Amar Singh, some distant relative of the infamous tyrant Khan Noonian Singh. He seemed to nearly worship Khan as a god, though between his almost mindless creations and a raving lunacy that makes Doctor Frankenstein sound reasonable, I don't think his ancestor would have been impressed. We apprehended him without any trouble and he should be settling into a detention facility cell as we speak.

* * *

Still, as childish and petty as his megalomania seemed, it was men like him who created the Augments, men who were simply better at hiding their madness and convincing themselves of their goodness. Their success had more to do with luck than skill: they were fumbling in the dark with selective breeding, hormone treatments and in vitro chemicals, with hardly any clue about the genome itself. For each Augment they created, hundreds of embryos died, or were born with horrible defects. They didn't care. The failures were just natural selection to them, the price of perfection.

But it worked, better and more terribly than those scientists dreamed, and for a time there were two species of humans, masters and slaves engulfed in a war that nearly tore the world apart, that set the stage for the war that actually did tear it apart just a few decades later. I can't help but wonder what things would be like today if none of that had ever happened. Would first contact and a united Earth have come that much sooner, or were those wars something humanity had to endure, to learn the lessons that allowed it to become the Federation we live in now?

* * *

We continued our pursuit of Ambassador B'vat, who, even if he didn't dream of genetic conquest himself, certainly gave Amar Singh all the support he needed for it. The chase led us to an unlikely ally, a Klingon named K'Valk who claimed that B'vat's plans were without honor, that defecting to the Federation was the only way to save the Klingon Empire from the ambassador's treachery.

He believe it too, and sacrificed himself without a second thought to save countless lives, both Federation and Klingon. We may be at war with the Klingons right now, but I've sent a request through the Diplomatic Corps that his sacrifice be honored by High Council. That seems unlikely for now, but maybe someday, when B'vat's been dealt with and peace has been restored, they'll agree.

We also worked closely with Lieutenant VanZyl, Commander Burgess's aide, and I've recommended a commendation for her work in stopping the Doomsday Machine's rampage. To be honest, she looked so much like Auslaz at first glance that I wondered if they might be related, but the hair and Trill spots are where their similarities end. She proved so confident and self-assured that I had to remind myself that being shy isn't so much a Trill trait as it is an Auslaz trait. I think our science officer was a little relieved when her more gregarious counterpart left for Earth, though we wouldn't trade her for the most outgoing Trill in the quadrant.

* * *

We learned that B'vat had found a second Doomsday Machine in the T'Ong Nebula, apparently guided there by information about the future a Klingon cabal received during the Temporal Cold War. Is "during" even the right word for something like that? Anyway, the mission to stop it gave us a crash course in all things Klingon, and I have to admit, being a Klingon isn't without its appeal.

K'Valk lent us a set of holoemitters to disguise ourselves as Klingon warriors, and it turns out my kendo lessons really paid off with the Nausicaan sword he gave me as part of the disguise. I think I pull off the leather armor look pretty well, though maybe not the teeth and forehead ridges so much. Dr Umliz had it far worse: apparently K'Valk only had one emitter for a male Klingon, so Kwam ended up as the extra female warrior. He handled the situation with, well, the boundless patience you'd expect of a former Vedek.

Imaga itself was beautiful, a rose-pink sky with giant mushrooms overhead like the Caterpillar's garden in Alice in Wonderland. Maybe the fact that the Klingons chose such a planet says something about their own sense of beauty and poetry. Okay, maybe it's more likely they just picked a strategic location, but they didn't cut or burn down the mushroom forest around their bases.

I wonder what my life would have been like if my stasis pod had been found by a Klingon ship rather than the Columbia? I probably would have been stuck working in a factory or a mine - the empire doesn't seem to have much respect for its subject species. Still, I bet I could have made a great Klingon warrior. Qapla'!

* * *

A Federation fleet managed to hold back B'vat's forces while we attacked the Doomsday Machine, using the same strategy that K'Valk attempted with a shuttle and that had disabled the weapon encountered so long ago in System L-374. We didn't have a Constellation-class warp core handy to throw into its maw, but the Hargh'Peng torpedoes on K'Valk's ship managed to destroy its engines with just a few shots. It's a shame that the only way to subdue these ancient machines is to completely destroy the technology within their neutronium shells: we could learn so much from studying them. I wonder who built them, and why?

We're on our way to rendezvous with the USS Kirk and hopefully follow a new lead on B'vat's plans. If he really does know the future, maybe fighting him is like trying to challenge fate. On the bright side, we've been giving fate a run for its money so far...

Last edited by sparklysoldier; 04-11-2013 at 04:37 PM.
Captain
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 1,213
# 32
03-17-2013, 09:59 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by sparklysoldier View Post
That makes sense, and it's even a little similar to her attitude on romance (saying no more, it'd mean spoilers ). It's also how I incidentally thought Odo should have been portrayed, and why his tendency to fall in love with humanoid woman (and I forgot until reading Memory Alpha that Kira wasn't his first relationship!) seemed so strange.
It seems really weird to me too, though I have heard a few theories that somehow they evolved from humanoids. (Which may even explain why the Changelings default to an appearance similar to the ancient humanoids from "The Chase." )

Alyosha doesn't have that common heritage or genetics; I put the humanoid-like form of the Devidians down to convergent evolution rather than seeding.

Quote:
Azera's doing the same thing in that line: "they're like the bogeyman," she says as though referencing stories on Earth (which she is, to some extent - it's been two generations since Wolf-359, so there's plenty of time for children to be born and raised hearing about the Borg), but what she really means is that they're her bogeymen, and everything she's been afraid of ever since waking up.
So Azera wouldn't have any memories of Wolf 359 or the cube in orbit of Earth? I guess I hadn't really taken in the fact that there is a generational difference between her and Alyosha; he was alive then and old enough to understand what was going on when his family was almost evacuated from Earth.

Quote:
True, and it'd be interesting if part of that also comes from how alien we seem to them, and how we inhabit a realm set apart from their own. Feeding on humanoids may seem a lot like fishing to them, dipping into an uninhabitable region to snare the creatures dwelling within for food, and hold just as much moral significance to them as it does to most of us.
That could certainly increase that impression, though it did seem to me that the Devidians had some innate ability to move back and forth in phase, which is also how I justify Alyosha staying in human form and phase for such extended periods. (He is superior at it than the normal Devidian, though, due to extensive exercise of the ability.)

Quote:
I'd certainly be interested in reading this story, if you're ever inspired to write it! I might give it a try it too, though there's a few stories to be writtten beforehand (and a big, big one's coming up soon - she's at level 23 now, and at level 30 she's going to learn the truth), but I'd trust your interpretation of her character if you find the free time and inspiration to tackle it someday.
It could also be interesting for us to alternate perspectives, and write it as a collaborative project.

Quote:
That'd lend itself to a neat psychic impression too: that with the flashes of blue comes a slight echoing effect (his perception of their conversation overlapping hers), almost giving a sense of being underwater to her.
That could well be...and yeah, very interesting. I wonder if she would really recognize that effect as being at all like what she's encountered with Devidians before, or only after it's revealed to her what he is?

Quote:
I'd imagine she'd get drawn into it, puzzled and increasingly haunted by a sense of deja vu and vague images and thoughts that she should know about this, that it's reminding her of something... and she'd be left at the end shaken, confused but respectful of how much it affected her. At the time, she'd give a nervous "that was really interesting, but one listen is enough for me," but it'd later become a part of her music collection once she's fully aware of her origin and has become comfortable with it.
Interesting! Something must definitely change, if her opinion on it would change to that extent.
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Lt. Commander
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 106
# 33
03-18-2013, 06:10 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by gulberat View Post
So Azera wouldn't have any memories of Wolf 359 or the cube in orbit of Earth? I guess I hadn't really taken in the fact that there is a generational difference between her and Alyosha; he was alive then and old enough to understand what was going on when his family was almost evacuated from Earth.
It keeps throwing me off too, how far removed 2409 really is from the events of any of the series. Not only does she not remember those things, she only arrived right as the new Klingon war was beginning and grew to adulthood through it. That's actually making one chronological detail in a later story a little awkward. Not impossible, just awkward... I'll have to ponder it some more...

Quote:
It could also be interesting for us to alternate perspectives, and write it as a collaborative project.
A flurry of stories are on their way, but once they settle down, that's not a bad idea.

Quote:
That could well be...and yeah, very interesting. I wonder if she would really recognize that effect as being at all like what she's encountered with Devidians before, or only after it's revealed to her what he is?
On an unconscious level I'd say, which would be where the suspicion's coming from. Once she can assign a reason to it, and recognize that the feeling is precisely the same as being around the Devidians, then it becomes much easier to treat it rationally and set it aside, which is why his explanation would do a lot to relieve the tension.

Quote:
Interesting! Something must definitely change, if her opinion on it would change to that extent.
Oh, things definitely change. But it'll be a long and winding road...
Lt. Commander
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 106
# 34
03-18-2013, 06:11 PM
Personal Log: "Days Gone By"
Stardate 90847.20

A little while ago I received a subspace message from the Romulan Ambassador at Earth Spacedock. We met during the promotion ceremony last month and she told me then that she might have some important information, and that she'd contact me again once she was certain it'd be of use. I had no idea what she meant by that, and with a Romulan ambassador, those aren't necessarily the sort of words you want to hear. But she wasn't kidding.

She said my appearance and the conversation we'd had about my past reminded her of something, and she'd checked the records on New Romulus to verify the details. She talked about a man named Commander Solak, a hero of the Romulan Star Empire. He wasn't a Romulan himself, though. He was found as an amnesiac child in an escape pod of unknown design, and overcame their prejudices only after countless battles won through bravery and ruthless cunning. She sent me a picture of him from their archives.

It's a copy of a photographic image, but it's clear enough. He's tall and pale, thin with ash blond hair cut short around his flattened ears and he has dark violet eyes. He looks like... he looks...

I'm sorry, this is silly of me. I've been crying off and on ever since I looked at that picture, and just trying to say the words makes me start all over again. I can't even tell if they're happy tears or sad tears. It's just too much emotion, if that makes any sense.

He looks like me. We're the same species.

And this picture is over eight hundred years old.

* * *

The ship he arrived in was lost during the destruction of Romulus, but she'd seen it in a museum as a child and sent me a picture of it. It's the same kind of ship. It's exactly the same.

In her own subtle way, the ambassador was amazingly tactful. She suggested that if we came from the same planet then his ship might have been pulled into the past by an unstable wormhole. She didn't mention the absolutely equal probability that my ship was the one that traveled through time. But the truth is, the odds of that happening to either one of us are almost infinitesimal.

I don't think he was pulled back in time, or that I was sent into the future. I think we both left our world at the same time, for the same reason. He just happened to be found sooner.

How many of us have there been? How long was I out there?

Last edited by sparklysoldier; 04-11-2013 at 04:37 PM.
Lt. Commander
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 111
# 35
03-18-2013, 06:31 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by sparklysoldier View Post
P
I'd better pause for now so I can feed Cho. That's the name of the tribble Ensign McMillan picked up at Drozana Station. I promised to watch her while Kaitlyn's attending the Gratitude Festival, and she's adorable. Oh, but she's sterile, so there's no harm in keeping her aboard. Though I'm a little worried about the five unclaimed tribbles we've found roaming the decks since then...
Nice doffing reference. Little details like that are always good
Captain
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 1,213
# 36
03-19-2013, 12:26 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by sparklysoldier View Post
A flurry of stories are on their way, but once they settle down, that's not a bad idea.
Cool.

Quote:
On an unconscious level I'd say, which would be where the suspicion's coming from. Once she can assign a reason to it, and recognize that the feeling is precisely the same as being around the Devidians, then it becomes much easier to treat it rationally and set it aside, which is why his explanation would do a lot to relieve the tension.
Especially since, if she focuses on him harder, she'll notice that the impressions of malicious intentions towards her are absent, that she might have noticed with the other Devidians.

Quote:
Oh, things definitely change. But it'll be a long and winding road...
It will be interesting to see how that happens--and it seems like this encounter with the Romulan ambassador is the first step.

I don't think her tears are stupid or ridiculous, though, as she does. She's encountered a first connection to her past and to her people, and unlike for Alyosha, where there's nothing but mutual loathing between him and the rest of his species, there is undoubtedly something very precious there.
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Lt. Commander
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 106
# 37
03-19-2013, 03:27 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by gazurtoid View Post
Nice doffing reference. Little details like that are always good
Thanks!

Quote:
Originally Posted by gulberat View Post
I don't think her tears are stupid or ridiculous, though, as she does. She's encountered a first connection to her past and to her people, and unlike for Alyosha, where there's nothing but mutual loathing between him and the rest of his species, there is undoubtedly something very precious there.
Oh, I don't think so either, and you phrased it perfectly. She's very self-conscious and dismissive of her own problems, so she feels like they're silly, but she's just been hit hard with a tantalizing glimpse of her own people, and the sense of both not being alone and of being even more alone than before. This entry's actually convinced me that, though I'd like to keep the Borg's history as vague as the shows have, the story that reveals her origins really, really needs to be written. It's too much a part of her to just leave out, and she deserves to see, along with the reader, where she came from and who her people once were.
Captain
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 1,213
# 38
03-19-2013, 06:47 PM
I'm glad you plan to post that story too. I think there can be multiple theories on where the Borg come from. I don't think it steps on anyone's toes any more thAn my theorizing about the Devidians does.
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Captain
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 2,872
# 39
03-19-2013, 07:55 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by gulberat View Post
I think there can be multiple theories on where the Borg come from.
"Where did the Borg come from?"

"Offscreen."
-------------------------------------------
I'm old enough not to care too much about what you think of me --
But I'm young enough to remember the future, the way things ought to be...

- Rush, "Cut To the Chase", Counterparts
Lt. Commander
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 106
# 40
04-02-2013, 09:56 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by jonsills View Post
"Where did the Borg come from?"

"Offscreen."
They're sneaky that way.

Last edited by sparklysoldier; 04-02-2013 at 09:58 PM.
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