Lt. Commander
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 120
# 71
01-17-2010, 08:55 AM
To be fair, he's kind of right on my part.

I started playing star trek last night, I have a radeon HD 4890. I play **** perfectly with this card, it only runs up my GFX up to 65 degrees max. The moment I boot up start trek though, my GFX goes haywhire and hits over 90 degrees on just the login screen.

There's defo something faulty about star trek and ati GFX cards. I dont feel like playing much when star trek makes my GFX go over 90 degrees.
Lt. Commander
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 120
# 72
01-17-2010, 09:23 AM
This game is pushing some very new video features that other games haven't really used to full extent before it seems. Also, it seems that the game relies more on your video card for rendering graphics then other games as well. This can lead to a video card being pushing to the max without relief from your actual computer. While I can't pin point what it is, it is a strong gut feeling.

Most people when getting a gaming computer just gets a everyday machine off of the shelf and buys a video card on the side. This issue with this that technicians should be warning you about is this:

Retail and everyday power supply have very terrible efficiency. Meaning that a standard 600 watt power supply may only have a efficiency of 60% or so: so meaning you're wasting 40% or more. Also these
"PSU"s are very prone to burning out when over worked. This happens often at the tech shops I worked at, someone installs a video card and when they finally get a game that pushes their system the PSU dies.

Also it is not just your power supply, heat is the number one cause of hardware failure now days. Installing a high end video card heats up your entire system like a oven and strains your video card over time. In addition to this, many people don't clean their systems so the fan cooling that most people have get worse from dust. Eventually from playing one high end game after another your video card will die usually after 1-2 years from heating.

There are ways to improve cooling in your system:

1) Adding an extra fan on the case. Do NOT get the little cards that blow air to your video card, it actually can screaw up air circulation of your case.

2) Make sure you have exhaust fans, air needs to come in as well as come out.

3) Room temperature. You may not notice it's hot, but your computer will. This is mainly important in the summer where people are playing games at 80-85 degrees room tempt.

4) Keep your system clean. Use a vacuum and blow the dust out of your system every few months or so.

5) Get a temperature checking program like speedfan, nvidia tuner etc to check the heat of your video card as well as your hard drives. Max out your fans.

6) This is unprofessional advice here and do so as a last resort: Getting a large room fan and open your case. Place room fan next to your case. This will keep it cool, but dust will cover your computer parts in no time. And when I mean fan - I mean a normal box fan.... not a swamp cooler (people these days).

7) Also as a last resort. Underclock. Yes people, I said it! Underclock your video card. If your card can't handle going max without straining your system or near overheating then you may want to downgrade the speed to something more manageable until you get better cooling.

--

Also to these talking about World of ******** as a comparison - you may want to see side by side comparisons of the minimum specs for running the game compared to Star Trek Online. This includes ****. I can run WoW on my p3 800 mhz computer with 258 ram and a craptisic 8 year old video card.

STO is a new game with, while mostly unnoticeable by most, new graphical features does seem to push your gaming system pretty hard. This is concerning because that means this game isn't accessible for a lot of people.

I would suggest Cryptic to find a way to push more of the load on the CPU since it seems to be causing heating issues with video cards. *However it is to be noted: that the latest drivers could be causing this issue*
Lt. Commander
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 120
# 73
01-17-2010, 10:32 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Imperiam View Post
This game is pushing some very new video features that other games haven't really used to full extent before it seems. Also, it seems that the game relies more on your video card for rendering graphics then other games as well. This can lead to a video card being pushing to the max without relief from your actual computer. While I can't pin point what it is, it is a strong gut feeling.

Most people when getting a gaming computer just gets a everyday machine off of the shelf and buys a video card on the side. This issue with this that technicians should be warning you about is this:

Retail and everyday power supply have very terrible efficiency. Meaning that a standard 600 watt power supply may only have a efficiency of 60% or so: so meaning you're wasting 40% or more. Also these
"PSU"s are very prone to burning out when over worked. This happens often at the tech shops I worked at, someone installs a video card and when they finally get a game that pushes their system the PSU dies.

Also it is not just your power supply, heat is the number one cause of hardware failure now days. Installing a high end video card heats up your entire system like a oven and strains your video card over time. In addition to this, many people don't clean their systems so the fan cooling that most people have get worse from dust. Eventually from playing one high end game after another your video card will die usually after 1-2 years from heating.

There are ways to improve cooling in your system:

1) Adding an extra fan on the case. Do NOT get the little cards that blow air to your video card, it actually can screaw up air circulation of your case.

2) Make sure you have exhaust fans, air needs to come in as well as come out.

3) Room temperature. You may not notice it's hot, but your computer will. This is mainly important in the summer where people are playing games at 80-85 degrees room tempt.

4) Keep your system clean. Use a vacuum and blow the dust out of your system every few months or so.

5) Get a temperature checking program like speedfan, nvidia tuner etc to check the heat of your video card as well as your hard drives. Max out your fans.

6) This is unprofessional advice here and do so as a last resort: Getting a large room fan and open your case. Place room fan next to your case. This will keep it cool, but dust will cover your computer parts in no time. And when I mean fan - I mean a normal box fan.... not a swamp cooler (people these days).

7) Also as a last resort. Underclock. Yes people, I said it! Underclock your video card. If your card can't handle going max without straining your system or near overheating then you may want to downgrade the speed to something more manageable until you get better cooling.

--

Also to these talking about World of ******** as a comparison - you may want to see side by side comparisons of the minimum specs for running the game compared to Star Trek Online. This includes ****. I can run WoW on my p3 800 mhz computer with 258 ram and a craptisic 8 year old video card.

STO is a new game with, while mostly unnoticeable by most, new graphical features does seem to push your gaming system pretty hard. This is concerning because that means this game isn't accessible for a lot of people.

I would suggest Cryptic to find a way to push more of the load on the CPU since it seems to be causing heating issues with video cards. *However it is to be noted: that the latest drivers could be causing this issue*
here! here! agreed!
Lt. Commander
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 120
# 74
01-17-2010, 10:42 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Imperiam View Post
This game is pushing some very new video features that other games haven't really used to full extent before it seems. Also, it seems that the game relies more on your video card for rendering graphics then other games as well. This can lead to a video card being pushing to the max without relief from your actual computer. While I can't pin point what it is, it is a strong gut feeling.

Most people when getting a gaming computer just gets a everyday machine off of the shelf and buys a video card on the side. This issue with this that technicians should be warning you about is this:

Retail and everyday power supply have very terrible efficiency. Meaning that a standard 600 watt power supply may only have a efficiency of 60% or so: so meaning you're wasting 40% or more. Also these
"PSU"s are very prone to burning out when over worked. This happens often at the tech shops I worked at, someone installs a video card and when they finally get a game that pushes their system the PSU dies.

Also it is not just your power supply, heat is the number one cause of hardware failure now days. Installing a high end video card heats up your entire system like a oven and strains your video card over time. In addition to this, many people don't clean their systems so the fan cooling that most people have get worse from dust. Eventually from playing one high end game after another your video card will die usually after 1-2 years from heating.

There are ways to improve cooling in your system:

1) Adding an extra fan on the case. Do NOT get the little cards that blow air to your video card, it actually can screaw up air circulation of your case.

2) Make sure you have exhaust fans, air needs to come in as well as come out.

3) Room temperature. You may not notice it's hot, but your computer will. This is mainly important in the summer where people are playing games at 80-85 degrees room tempt.

4) Keep your system clean. Use a vacuum and blow the dust out of your system every few months or so.

5) Get a temperature checking program like speedfan, nvidia tuner etc to check the heat of your video card as well as your hard drives. Max out your fans.

6) This is unprofessional advice here and do so as a last resort: Getting a large room fan and open your case. Place room fan next to your case. This will keep it cool, but dust will cover your computer parts in no time. And when I mean fan - I mean a normal box fan.... not a swamp cooler (people these days).

7) Also as a last resort. Underclock. Yes people, I said it! Underclock your video card. If your card can't handle going max without straining your system or near overheating then you may want to downgrade the speed to something more manageable until you get better cooling.

--

Also to these talking about World of ******** as a comparison - you may want to see side by side comparisons of the minimum specs for running the game compared to Star Trek Online. This includes ****. I can run WoW on my p3 800 mhz computer with 258 ram and a craptisic 8 year old video card.

STO is a new game with, while mostly unnoticeable by most, new graphical features does seem to push your gaming system pretty hard. This is concerning because that means this game isn't accessible for a lot of people.

I would suggest Cryptic to find a way to push more of the load on the CPU since it seems to be causing heating issues with video cards. *However it is to be noted: that the latest drivers could be causing this issue*
Doesnt have anything to do with this if you just sit at login screen on STO and your GFX is already being pushed to 90 degrees though. When it happens at login screen, where absolutely nothing happens yet, then its the game.
Lt. Commander
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 120
# 75
01-17-2010, 01:00 PM
With all due respect, and although that advice is generally good advice, in this case its bullcrap.

The game looks nowhere near good enough to warrant the kind of resources and temperatures it pushes people hardware to. Not to mention you can dial back the settings and you still get the same crap. (IE I can run all other games maxed out but try STO at ancient resolutions and features turned off, and use still pegged)

The engine needs some serious debugging to find out why it wastes so much power and resources. At this moment the damn thing operates like the game engine is a burnin/stress test for GPU/CPU/PSU and cooling setup.

And true, software can't have code in it that says 'blow up PSU' or 'break GFX card' or whatever, but you're an idiot if you think software can't damage hardware. Pegging 4 cores at 100% for 100% of the time, or using 100% of a GPU 100%, of the time is just like having a stereo and turning it up to 11 every single time you listen to music... you'll blow a speaker alot sooner than if you leave it at 75% on average.
Lt. Commander
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 120
# 76
01-17-2010, 01:31 PM
I'd also add to PSU buying advice - don't go for cheap stuff. Not only they have bad efficiency, but they also are made from not the top notch components. THere is a much of difference between lets say Antec/Corsair 500W PSU and "noname" 500W PSU.

The high end stuff might be twice or triple the price of a standard PSU, but they are usually using japanese solid capacitors, have been stresstested, their ventilation is top notch. And taking that if the PSU blows, your whole computer goes to the drain, it's a smart investment. Besides you won't be channging the PSU as often as other components.

It's like the warp core... would you rather have one made by Vulcans or by Ferengi?
Lt. Commander
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 120
# 77
01-18-2010, 12:58 AM
I dunno. I'm running this and here's a screen shot, for those hard of sight:

GPU Temp: 75C
PCB Temp: 67C
Fan Speed: 2193RPM
GPU Load: 83%

Also,
System RAM used: 68%
CPU Load: 11%

And you'll note the large number of PCs at Sol's Spacedock.

http://img59.imageshack.us/img59/805/stoshot.png
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