Career Officer
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 3,168
# 51
04-18-2013, 09:07 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by jonsills View Post
For what it's worth, my head-canon has combined Diane Duane's ch'Havran (where the less-well-connected Ship families went) with the modern Remans, and decided that ch'Havran was also rich in radioactives, and Remans are what happens when Rihannsu are forced to work in highly-teratogenic conditions for a few thousand years.
Makes sense, given that the Havrannsu were there mining heavy metals.

Doesn't Havran mean "Travelers" and Rihan mean "Declared"? Seems like there was always a caste system in place even when the Rom/Rem system was initially being settled.

Anyway, I always understood that the Rihannsu and Havrannsu were initially both identical to the early Vulcans, but as a few millennia passed and they adapted to their different environments the two races are now as different from each other as they each are from the Vulcans.


"Freedom is just a pretty idea unless it's backed by Force."

An Introduction to the Gorn (RP guide) / Ten Forward Fanfics
Career Officer
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 3,168
# 52
04-18-2013, 09:11 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by marcusdkane View Post
I know, I'd said I'd be giving this challenge a miss, but, I figured that if I skipped challenges I didn't like, I wouldn't stretch myself, and inspiration finally hit me today. Not a format I enjoy writing in, but I hope it will be enjoyable...

For ease of reference/visualization, here're the actors I would cast if I was filming this tomorrow...

Bella - Olivia Wilde
Ael t'Kazanak - Cobie Smulders
Thank you for putting in the effort. I enjoyed the entry very much! I think the tattoo parlor is the perfect setting for two near-strangers to have an intimate conversation about ones past.

On a personal note, I'm in the process of having some work done (a full set of shark jaws across my upper back and shoulder blades) and your details were spot on! I just wish the future would hurry up and get here to make the whole procedure as quick and painless as what you described.


"Freedom is just a pretty idea unless it's backed by Force."

An Introduction to the Gorn (RP guide) / Ten Forward Fanfics
Ensign
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 16
# 53 The continuation of Sarik
04-18-2013, 09:42 PM
I have added more to my storyline and included his personal daily logs and there will be more to come. Hope you guys enjoy it.
Captain
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 1,085
# 54
04-18-2013, 11:24 PM
The Remans of my head canon were deliberately genetically-manipulated into what they are by the Romulans, partly to make them better suited to mining--and partly to make "deromulanization" easier (i.e. the ability to treat them as creatures and not people).
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Captain
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 3,237
# 55
04-19-2013, 03:52 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by sander233 View Post
Thank you for putting in the effort. I enjoyed the entry very much! I think the tattoo parlor is the perfect setting for two near-strangers to have an intimate conversation about ones past.

On a personal note, I'm in the process of having some work done (a full set of shark jaws across my upper back and shoulder blades) and your details were spot on! I just wish the future would hurry up and get here to make the whole procedure as quick and painless as what you described.
Thanks, I figured the only way to progress and learn was to push through, but in a way, I feel this was actually one of the weakest things I've written... There were no truly fictional elements, Ael's manner is hardly typical for a Romulan (although I could justify that by saying that her upbringing off-world and integration into Federation society has made her 'more Human' ) and although I used the first person, I did not create a character for the narrator, I merely temporally transposed myself into the scenario and tweaked a few details... I kind of feel that by deliberately avoiding my Usual Suspects, I wound up doing a half-assed job of it :-\

Sounds like an interesting piece When you say shark jaws, do you mean as in just the bones, as are sometimes displayed, or is there a body to it as well, or even just the classic image of the shark from the poster? I think my next piece is going to be the kanji for soup on my right buttock (as per the Big Bang Theory joke) although by choice, I would really like to get the dragon on my back fully outlined (just a head and claw at the moment... )
Captain
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 3,237
# 56
04-19-2013, 04:56 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by cosmonaut12345 View Post
I have expanded Dr. Othan's story.
Nicely done One thing which caught my attention, was the mention of the mourning tattoos. I believe I read that they are supposed to only be temporary, like henna, and once they fade, the person's period of mourning must end, where Nero's boys decided to have them permanently done (I have to admit, I much preferred the idea of them being mourning tattoos, than the idea that they got so bored waiting for Spock, all they had to pass the time was getting tatted up )
Lt. Commander
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 114
# 57
04-19-2013, 05:38 AM
The idea I had was that the mourning tattoos are a thing for Romulans of a certain generation - we never stop mourning Romulus and our dead families, etc, especially once they became associated with Nero, the one great hero who was striking back, etc.
Commander
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 406
# 58
04-19-2013, 05:43 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by marcusdkane View Post
Thanks, I figured the only way to progress and learn was to push through, but in a way, I feel this was actually one of the weakest things I've written... There were no truly fictional elements, Ael's manner is hardly typical for a Romulan (although I could justify that by saying that her upbringing off-world and integration into Federation society has made her 'more Human' ) and although I used the first person, I did not create a character for the narrator, I merely temporally transposed myself into the scenario and tweaked a few details... I kind of feel that by deliberately avoiding my Usual Suspects, I wound up doing a half-assed job of it :-\

Speaking solely from my own experiences, I think the there are three very hard things for a writer to learn about writing.

The first is how to set aside their own viewpoints, worldview, and what they would decide in a situation in favor of that of the character(s) they are attempting to write about. In essence how to recognize when the writer is possessing the characters and not letting the characters act as they should (characters not making stupid mistakes, or failing to decide things in a way the author wouldn't when they should).

The second is the acceptance that no piece they do will ever match what they believe they could have done. No writer is ever completely satisfied with their work, but if we hold onto our work until it is 'ready', no one else can ever appreciate it. As long as others appreciate the work and enjoy the piece (or it achieves the objective the author mainly wanted to accomplish), then we simply have to accept the acclaim or criticism of others as proof that it is what it should have been.

The third, of course, is how to begin. Not the prose or the means, but how to put the first words onto the paper/screen. Finding the words to begin is the biggest step in making a piece, from which everything else flows, but putting those first words down can be the biggest hurdle in doing any writing. From 'Once upon a time..." to "A man walked into a bar on Rura-Penthe...', it's those words that set the cornerstone of any piece, and it's very easy for a writer to get stuck groping for those words, or just going around and around in their own brains while the page/screen stays blank. Putting those first words into print and letting them stay is always a trial and, any author that gets past that to complete a piece deserves a measure of respect.

So, don't sweat the flaws in your work. Let others decide if they are flaws, especially when they have to deal with the same themselves

Edit: And the fourth thing is that authors who sound like they know they know what they are talking about probably have alot to learn themselves. And those who don't know they sound like they know they know what they are talking about should get back to writing before the lynch mob shows up. Only trust the words of those who don't know they know what they are talking about, you know?

Last edited by danqueller; 04-19-2013 at 07:50 AM.
Captain
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 3,237
# 59
04-19-2013, 09:02 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by danqueller View Post
Speaking solely from my own experiences, I think the there are three very hard things for a writer to learn about writing.

The first is how to set aside their own viewpoints, worldview, and what they would decide in a situation in favor of that of the character(s) they are attempting to write about. In essence how to recognize when the writer is possessing the characters and not letting the characters act as they should (characters not making stupid mistakes, or failing to decide things in a way the author wouldn't when they should).

The second is the acceptance that no piece they do will ever match what they believe they could have done. No writer is ever completely satisfied with their work, but if we hold onto our work until it is 'ready', no one else can ever appreciate it. As long as others appreciate the work and enjoy the piece (or it achieves the objective the author mainly wanted to accomplish), then we simply have to accept the acclaim or criticism of others as proof that it is what it should have been.

The third, of course, is how to begin. Not the prose or the means, but how to put the first words onto the paper/screen. Finding the words to begin is the biggest step in making a piece, from which everything else flows, but putting those first words down can be the biggest hurdle in doing any writing. From 'Once upon a time..." to "A man walked into a bar on Rura-Penthe...', it's those words that set the cornerstone of any piece, and it's very easy for a writer to get stuck groping for those words, or just going around and around in their own brains while the page/screen stays blank. Putting those first words into print and letting them stay is always a trial and, any author that gets past that to complete a piece deserves a measure of respect.

So, don't sweat the flaws in your work. Let others decide if they are flaws, especially when they have to deal with the same themselves

Edit: And the fourth thing is that authors who sound like they know they know what they are talking about probably have alot to learn themselves. And those who don't know they sound like they know they know what they are talking about should get back to writing before the lynch mob shows up. Only trust the words of those who don't know they know what they are talking about, you know?
That's fantastic advice for any writer, I'm sure many will find it of use I don't normally have any issue with the first point, as writing in the 3rd person automatically 'takes me out of myself', so I just let the characters write themselves. In this particular instance, I saw how folks had gone for the first person narrative from the character's point of view, so I wanted to try and invert that by having the narrator in the first person, being spoken to by the character. I've heard before that people should 'write what they know', and two things I know, are Trek, and tattooing, I just didn't fancy coming up with another character as the narrator, so simply transposed myself into the situation. I'm not sure if that's sloppy writing, but I somehow feel like I was cutting corners, so not entirely happy with the end work as a result... Of course, if people are simply reading it as a narrator and finding it enjoyable, then I guess that's what counts
Commander
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 406
# 60
04-19-2013, 09:46 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by marcusdkane View Post
That's fantastic advice for any writer, I'm sure many will find it of use I don't normally have any issue with the first point, as writing in the 3rd person automatically 'takes me out of myself', so I just let the characters write themselves. In this particular instance, I saw how folks had gone for the first person narrative from the character's point of view, so I wanted to try and invert that by having the narrator in the first person, being spoken to by the character. I've heard before that people should 'write what they know', and two things I know, are Trek, and tattooing, I just didn't fancy coming up with another character as the narrator, so simply transposed myself into the situation. I'm not sure if that's sloppy writing, but I somehow feel like I was cutting corners, so not entirely happy with the end work as a result... Of course, if people are simply reading it as a narrator and finding it enjoyable, then I guess that's what counts
Exactly! It's not necessarily sloppy writing, just a different way of approaching the story. It's only sloppy if it becomes habit, in my opinion. Also, the desire to do things differently from what others have done is one of the core motivations in writing (or any art), so there's nothing wrong if that's what you decide to do with yours.

If it helps, just remember that you aren't in the same situation as the writer who had to put down a great story on the first walls of the Great Pyramids, staring at the blank wall and trying to figure out how it should go while the Pharoah sat drumming his fingers on a nearby throne and giving the Royal Executioner glances.

This is for fun and challenge. Enjoy it, and just do what you can at any given time.
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