Career Officer
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 867
# 51
06-14-2013, 09:31 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by naevius View Post
Charged particles of any kind repel each other, and thus cannot be formed into a beam.

Now, if you want to hand-wave, you could assume the beam is 'jacketed' in some fasion.
It is not that. You can create a beam of charged particles if you provide them with enough momentum. The electron beam in CRT televisions worked that way. So does florescent lighting, more or less.

The issue is that charge is a conserved quantity. If you are shooting a large number of charged particles off an object in space, it is going to build up an opposite charge very quickly, which is going to deflect any charged particle beam and eventually, as the charge builds up, cause the beam to slow and return to the object from which it was launched.
Captain
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 3,465
# 52
06-14-2013, 09:37 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by logicalspock View Post
It is not that. You can create a beam of charged particles if you provide them with enough momentum. The electron beam in CRT televisions worked that way. So does florescent lighting, more or less.

The issue is that charge is a conserved quantity. If you are shooting a large number of charged particles off an object in space, it is going to build up an opposite charge very quickly, which is going to deflect any charged particle beam and eventually, as the charge builds up, cause the beam to slow and return to the object from which it was launched.
Not to mention the inherent hilarity of a weapon firing a projectile/beam that reacts catastrophically to contact with any quantity of matter, not just the target.
Captain
Join Date: May 2013
Posts: 988
# 53
06-14-2013, 09:52 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by durenas View Post
Which would make Data's brain a bomb waiting to happen.

Assuming "Positronic" has anything to do with positrons.
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Captain
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 633
# 54
06-14-2013, 01:42 PM
Regarding OP...

I think basically what people really like about Disruptors and Plasmas is that their procs are directly damage related, rather than affecting subsystems/energy levels.

Besides that all the other numbers (Acc, CrtD, CrtH, etc.) can be on all other energy weapons as well.

I usually use either Phasers or Antiprotons (AP), I actually got Phasers that were spec'd the same as my APs (Mark level and Crits) from Season 7 (when you could get AntiBorg gear reasonably quickly) and felt that the APs still hit harder, but I have no data to back that up.
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Last edited by sirokk; 06-14-2013 at 01:51 PM.
Career Officer
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 983
# 55
06-14-2013, 06:35 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by logicalspock View Post
This is incorrect. According to the standard model, electron-positron annihilation, involving two leptons, undergoes mutual annihilation and converts all the energy of a particle to a photon. Using E=mc^2, you can easily calculate that even at rest those photons must be in the gamma ray energy range, as is the case with all nuclear reactions.

Baryonic annihilation, by contrast, is much more complicated. For instance, if a proton and an antiproton collide, you can get many different constituent particles. However, most of these particles are either unstable and decay or annihilate with ordinary matter, so ultimately you end up with gamma rays, neutrinos, and leptons.

The moral of the story is, do some research before trying to correct someone.
Actually, they're all unstable. The only stable quark-composite particles are the Proton, Antiproton, Neutron, and Antinuetron. Though, you are right, that baryon annihilation doesn't go directly to 2 high energy photons; Often, other quark-composite particles form, and then decay themselves. You *might* get an electron and positron out of baryon annihilation, but it's unlikely.
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