Lt. Commander
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 120
# 171
01-27-2010, 12:37 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Catamount View Post
Did you use enough thermal compound on that Pentium CPU?! :p

That's so awesome though...
Thanks. And LOL, well ceramic is different than aluminum heat spreaders. As you know, you should always use a very, very thin coating for newer CPUs with aluminum heat spreaders for better performance. But for ceramic, it's very porous and will absorb most of that thermal compound paste over time. Also, ceramic is pretty close to thermal paste for heat conductivity -- unlike aluminum -- so having excess isn't as big of a deal as it is for modern CPUs.
Lt. Commander
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 120
# 172
01-27-2010, 12:43 PM
I see, that's very interesting. I suppose given the operating temperatures of the CPUs of the day, it mattered a little less to have the type of thermal conductivity that's required for today's chips, hence the passive heat sink.
Lt. Commander
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 120
# 173
01-27-2010, 12:49 PM
Speaking of thermal paste, perhaps you could answer a question. While it's generally no issue, I was concerned about the heat my video cards produce in Furmark (~87C), because unlike most places I've lived, NC tends to have very hot summers, and this room can get into the low 80s F at times.

Do you think I might be able to improve thermal performance by replacing the thermal compound/pad on my GPUs with some AS5?
Lt. Commander
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 120
# 174
01-27-2010, 12:50 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Catamount View Post
I see, that's very interesting. I suppose given the operating temperatures of the CPUs of the day, it mattered a little less to have the type of thermal conductivity that's required for today's chips, hence the passive heat sink.
Yup. Remember the old 286 and 386 chips, of which most did not have any heatsink at all? 486 CPUs brought an end to that. I remember seeing the first fan/heatsink combos with 486 and Pentium chips that were overclocked back in the days. Glad we're past the days when overclocking meant changing jumpers or soldering a wire or two or penciling-in some traces.

Talking about overheating, those overclocks back then could literally blow the ceramic right off the CPU.
Lt. Commander
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 120
# 175
01-27-2010, 12:56 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by cipher_nemo View Post
Yup. Remember the old 286 and 386 chips, of which most did not have any heatsink at all? 486 CPUs brought an end to that. I remember seeing the first fan/heatsink combos with 486 and Pentium chips that were overclocked back in the days. Glad we're past the days when overclocking meant changing jumpers or soldering a wire or two or penciling-in some traces.

Talking about overheating, those overclocks back then could literally blow the ceramic right off the CPU.
Haha, yeah it was pretty bad, especially with some of the 3rd party chips (Cyrex and AMD knockoffs tended to obscenely hot no matter what )

Of course, a lot of that is before my time, as I didn't come in until the very end of the 90s. Most of my experience is in later play with a lot of this older stuff. My high school's help desk was a utopia of old parts. In fact, the fastest things they were able to scrounge up for workstations for me when I volunteered were a PIII500 for Fedora and a 750mhz version for Windows XP. The tech guy who headed it once jokingly asked if I'd like to see the "biggest" hard drive he had, and when I said yes, he pulled out a giant unit that went into a 5.25' bay
Lt. Commander
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 120
# 176
01-27-2010, 01:17 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Catamount View Post
(...) he pulled out a giant unit that went into a 5.25' bay
Hahaha! Those were beasts. They advertised hard drives in those days by how many floppies worth of data they could hold.

The first hard drive I owned was a 30 MB model.

But here's an older 10 MB model! In those days, the hard drives make so much noise and vibration that they had to suspend them with large rubber mounts.
Lt. Commander
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 120
# 177
01-27-2010, 01:33 PM
Hehe, yep, that looks about right. The one I saw was 20MB.
Lt. Commander
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 120
# 178
01-27-2010, 03:13 PM
Great minds.... I keep enough spare parts to slap together one or two complete systems. I love my games so every 2-3 years I usually end up replacing my video card. So, I have a nice 8800GTX sitting in my spare parts pile just in case.

I actually had to use my spare PSU recently as my primary died in a glorious smokey loud bang. On the RMA form for reason for return... unit exploded.

All good points about SLI/Xfire. My next video card upgrade I might consider an x2 card. We will see, pretty happy with my GTX 285 at the moment..
Lt. Commander
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 120
# 179
01-27-2010, 04:57 PM
If im just overlooking, or a post i made in here was conveniently deleted. It was in regard to an issue with the game, and it heating up graphics cards. I have a BFG GTX 285 OCX, inside of a Thermaltake Armor Full Tower case, with 2x120mm front fans, 2x120mm rear fans, and a 25 CM side panel fan. I run crysis under full load and i hit 70c and sometimes up to 74c.
I go to the character selection screen in this game, and my GPU is already at 70c. Something isnt right about that. And no, its not due to insufficient cooling, nor is it due to excessive dust or etc. Someone posted something about frying an 8800GT in the game, thats pretty rough. I have an 8800GT in my backup computer, and those bad boys are rock solid.
I would have to say, that there is something in the game that needs to be fixed. It's an awesome game, and by far the best looking star trek game Ive ever seen.
Lt. Commander
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 120
# 180
01-27-2010, 05:50 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by -TFO-Thunderhawk
If im just overlooking, or a post i made in here was conveniently deleted. It was in regard to an issue with the game, and it heating up graphics cards. I have a BFG GTX 285 OCX, inside of a Thermaltake Armor Full Tower case, with 2x120mm front fans, 2x120mm rear fans, and a 25 CM side panel fan. I run crysis under full load and i hit 70c and sometimes up to 74c.
I go to the character selection screen in this game, and my GPU is already at 70c. Something isnt right about that. And no, its not due to insufficient cooling, nor is it due to excessive dust or etc. Someone posted something about frying an 8800GT in the game, thats pretty rough. I have an 8800GT in my backup computer, and those bad boys are rock solid.
I would have to say, that there is something in the game that needs to be fixed. It's an awesome game, and by far the best looking star trek game Ive ever seen.
As said many, many, many, many, many, many times by a number of people deserving an equal number of "many"'s, STO can do no more than max out your GPU, which while surprising for a game, should still be doing nothing that your system can't handle.

Crysis is not some end all, be all graphical application. It doesn't come anywhere close to maxing out a GPU, so whether or not your system can "run Crysis on high" is really pretty irrelevant. Just because Crysis has beefy system requirements doesn't mean that its engine is especially prone to generating heat. When a system is struggling to run Crysis, it simply runs slowly, not hot.

I think your particular GPU can probably run for sustained periods on the mid 80s at least, so until you start hitting 90 or so, don't worry about it.
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