Captain
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 5,772
# 1 Really Depressing Information
06-30-2013, 08:11 AM
It has been over 40.5 years since Man has landed on the moon. What has happened to our sense of exploration?
Commander
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 426
# 2
06-30-2013, 08:14 AM
We realized that landing people on the moon didn't actually explore anything useful?

Meanwhile, just three days ago, NASA launched the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) probe aboard a Pegasus-XL rocket to explore the sun's chromosphere.
Commander
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 398
# 3
06-30-2013, 08:16 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by starkaos View Post
It has been over 40.5 years since Man has landed on the moon. What has happened to our sense of exploration?
In all honesty, I think two things caused the halt we've seen.

1. The end of the Cold War. Nothing causes scientific progress like hating another country.
2. Challenger. I think that tragedy really sucked the fire out of our space shuttle program. I remember watching it in school and everybody was devastated. Absolutely devastated.

Like you, though, the fact that we're not exploring the stars makes me sad.

On the bright side, more and more private companies are taking an interest in space travel. If there's one thing that's a stronger motivator than hating other countries, it's money.
Career Officer
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 5,946
# 4
06-30-2013, 08:21 AM
The need to explore hasn't gone away, but let's face it: The trip to mars, to bring back more stones... that's not really exploring.
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Captain
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 5,772
# 5
06-30-2013, 08:24 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by squishkin View Post
We realized that landing people on the moon didn't actually explore anything useful?

Meanwhile, just three days ago, NASA launched the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) probe aboard a Pegasus-XL rocket to explore the sun's chromosphere.
Its not a matter of what we can find on the Moon, but what we can build there. Telescopes that have much better resolution than anything that can be build on the Earth. The ability to perform dangerous experiments or create dangerous chemicals that could harm or kill millions of people if something goes wrong. Also we only scratched the surface of the Moon so it might contain valuable resources that we know nothing about.
Career Officer
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 244
# 6
06-30-2013, 10:35 AM
Well we did find out the moon is full of fusion fuel.
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Survivor of Romulus
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 801
# 7
06-30-2013, 11:58 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by scruffyvulcan View Post
In all honesty, I think two things caused the halt we've seen.

1. The end of the Cold War. Nothing causes scientific progress like hating another country.
2. Challenger. I think that tragedy really sucked the fire out of our space shuttle program. I remember watching it in school and everybody was devastated. Absolutely devastated.

Like you, though, the fact that we're not exploring the stars makes me sad.

On the bright side, more and more private companies are taking an interest in space travel. If there's one thing that's a stronger motivator than hating other countries, it's money.
My mom used to let me stay home from school to watch the shuttle launches and landings and seeing Challenger explode is one thing I will never forget for the rest of my life, and then to find out later that they didn't die instantly in the explosion.

Challenger should have been the wake up call that the rocket technology was too unstable and too obsolete and that a new solution was needed. The real problem was no one knew where to begin on a redesign, they didn't have the budget and resources for an extensive redesign/refit and they had a schedule to keep.

Every wide-eyed dreamer from the 50's until the late 80's wanted to fly amongst the stars, and those that had the opportunity to try knew the risks and still wanted to anyways.

Being an 80's baby I loved the space shuttle and the program, but in many ways the Shuttle greatly outlived it's lifespan. There was already much more advanced technology not just in theoretical but in practical forms as well.

Unfortunately budget and "been there, done that" took over and we stopped seeing a need to go back to the moon or even farther than Earth orbit. Now Nasa wants to take three steps back and return to the moon, but with an antiquated design with more modern technology. Let's not forget the Staged rocket and capsule design had it's fair share of issues and tragedy as well.

A moon base for manufacturing, research and development, resource gathering (both on the moon and capture and recycling "space junk", construction, and as a stepping stone is where we need to head next. All the money and research to this end has been done (Biosphere 2), failures occurred and were learned from and corrected, but even now it still sits unused. This could have been done yesterday or even 10 years ago.

The disbanding of the Shuttle program has had one good effect, the private sector is starting a miniature space race of it's own. They're on the starting line, and once the race finally begins I believe we'll see more advances come from that alone than we have since the cold war ended.
Commander
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 398
# 8
06-30-2013, 12:54 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by voicesdark View Post
My mom used to let me stay home from school to watch the shuttle launches and landings and seeing Challenger explode is one thing I will never forget for the rest of my life, and then to find out later that they didn't die instantly in the explosion.

Challenger should have been the wake up call that the rocket technology was too unstable and too obsolete and that a new solution was needed. The real problem was no one knew where to begin on a redesign, they didn't have the budget and resources for an extensive redesign/refit and they had a schedule to keep.

Every wide-eyed dreamer from the 50's until the late 80's wanted to fly amongst the stars, and those that had the opportunity to try knew the risks and still wanted to anyways.

Being an 80's baby I loved the space shuttle and the program, but in many ways the Shuttle greatly outlived it's lifespan. There was already much more advanced technology not just in theoretical but in practical forms as well.

Unfortunately budget and "been there, done that" took over and we stopped seeing a need to go back to the moon or even farther than Earth orbit. Now Nasa wants to take three steps back and return to the moon, but with an antiquated design with more modern technology. Let's not forget the Staged rocket and capsule design had it's fair share of issues and tragedy as well.

A moon base for manufacturing, research and development, resource gathering (both on the moon and capture and recycling "space junk", construction, and as a stepping stone is where we need to head next. All the money and research to this end has been done (Biosphere 2), failures occurred and were learned from and corrected, but even now it still sits unused. This could have been done yesterday or even 10 years ago.

The disbanding of the Shuttle program has had one good effect, the private sector is starting a miniature space race of it's own. They're on the starting line, and once the race finally begins I believe we'll see more advances come from that alone than we have since the cold war ended.
I agree on all counts.
Captain
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 5,772
# 9
06-30-2013, 01:09 PM
The simple fact is that lots of us on these forums would jump at the chance to go to the moon. We want to travel to distant star systems, walk on strange worlds, witness amazing stellar phenomena up close, and maybe score with hot alien babes. A moon colony is the first step for this amazing journey to happen. Although, I would say the first step would be building a space elevator to make Space more accessible.
Rihannsu
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 3,795
# 10
06-30-2013, 02:00 PM
there were many later missions to the moon as well.

I think there are a lot of reasons things slow down. money, politics, the space race itself was clearly a major factor that once was won, did not need to be raced again and there really is no pressing need to go elsewhere in any hurry. if mars had life on it then there would have been a real desire to get there quickly. as it stands, it was a dead world in the 70's and it will be a dead world when we get there. so no rush.

also just keep in mind how vast space is. going to the moon is like popping down the road. going to mars is a much much more complex journey. lots of complex tech has to be invented and its not quick or cheap.

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